Trump Veers Off TelePrompter to Hype Energy Policy, Job Surge Back Into America

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The Associated Press

President Donald Trump veered off his planned remarks when speaking about energy and a job surge back into America, two bread-and-butter economic nationalist core 2016 campaign agenda areas—a sign he did not, while speaking live, think his speechwriters went far enough.

Trump added a variety of adjectives and emphasis to his planned remarks when speaking about ending the war on coal and attracting auto businesses and other manufacturers to come back to America from abroad.

“We have ended the war on American Energy — and we have ended the war on beautiful, clean coal,” Trump actually said. “We are now an exporter of energy to the world. In Detroit, I halted Government mandates that crippled America’s autoworkers — so we can get the Motor City revving its engines once again. Many car companies are now building and expanding plants in the United States — something we have not seen for decades. Chrysler is moving a major plant from Mexico to Michigan; Toyota and Mazda are opening up a plant in Alabama—a big one, and we haven’t seen this in a long time. It’s all coming back.  This is all news Americans are totally unaccustomed to hearing. Soon, plants will be opening up all over the country. This is all news Americans are unaccustomed to hearing — for many years, companies and jobs were only leaving us. But now they are coming back. They are roaring back. They want to be in the United States of America.”

The planned remarks had much less excitement from Trump.

“We have ended the war on American Energy — and we have ended the war on clean coal,” the planned remarks had him saying. “We are now an exporter of energy to the world. In Detroit, I halted Government mandates that crippled America’s autoworkers — so we can get the Motor City revving its engines once again. Many car companies are now building and expanding plants in the United States — something we have not seen for decades. Chrysler is moving a major plant from Mexico to Michigan; Toyota and Mazda are opening up a plant in Alabama.  Soon, plants will be opening up all over the country. This is all news Americans are unaccustomed to hearing — for many years, companies and jobs were only leaving us.  But now they are coming back.”

That means he added the word “beautiful” when describing “clean coal” and added “roaring back” when describing jobs coming back to the United States from abroad, among other additions.

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