IndieWire Writer Finds Appearance of Black Conservative in Palin Doc 'Shocking'

***UPDATE: Sonnie Johnson received an email apology from Kaufman. Unimpressed, she responds.

In the Wall Street Journal, film writer Anthony Kaufman did a fairly straight-forward interview with “The Undefeated” writer/director Steve Bannon. Fine. Good. Proper. Afterwards, though, Kaufman then took to his usual perch at indieWIRE to let his true feelings be known. Mostly, his indieWIRE piece reflects the usual nonsense-complaints coming from the Left over why a documentary specifically produced to tell the story of Governor Palin the MSM refused to tell doesn’t rehash everything the MSM has already rehashed ad nauseum for the last three years.

Blah-blah-blah. Whine-whine-whine. Boo-hoo-hoo. Heaven forbid the public learns the full truth and context about a potential presidential candidate minus everything they’ve already had tattooed on their brain. Then, however, Kaufman gets to this unbelievably offensive and revealing sentence:

For me, the most shocking moment in “The Undefeated,” however, comes with the appearance of a black person about two-thirds of the way through.

No matter how many times I read this (and there’s more), I’m left almost speechless.

Almost.

This “black person” Kaufman references does have a name … and it’s Sonnie Johnson. She’s a person, not a symbol, and she has a mind of her own. A very good mind.

Before I let Ms. Johnson speak for herself, I’m going to go ahead and call Anthony Kaufman an elitist bigot. You see, the reason the arrival of a black face likely shocked him is probably due to the fact that he’s never bothered to attend a real Tea Party … or maybe Kaufman simply can’t bring himself to recognize Thomas Sowell, Condi Rice, Clarence Thomas, Lloyd Marcus, Sonja Schmidt, Herman Cain, JC Watts, Alan Keyes, Michael Steele, Frances Rice, Jennifer Carroll, Allen West, Martin Luther King, Jackie Robinson, Tim Scott (need I go on…?) as “real black people” due to their awful, sell-out, Uncle Tomming Republican-ness.

Maybe if Mr. Kaufman would take a cue from Ms. Johnson and start to think for himself, he wouldn’t find the onscreen arrival of a black face in support of Sarah Palin and the Tea Party so gosh-darned “shocking.” Obviously, all Kaufman saw in Ms. Johnson was the color of her skin, which betrays something about him, no?

Kaufman’s issues with non-white conservatives truly rears its ugly head in his next sentence:

I’m not sure if it’s what Bannon had in mind when he wanted to seize the audience’s attention, but the arrival of black conservative female activist Sonnie Johnson made me realize just how white everyone appears to be, in both Palin’s Alaska and Bannon’s Tea Party.

He’s “not sure what Bannon had in mind when he wanted to seize the audience’s attention”?

Wow.

Next time, Kaufman should save himself all that typing and simply write: T-O-K-E-N.

And now — at the risk of further shocking Kaufman — I’ll let Sonnie Johnson speak for herself:

Anthony Kaufman published a little blog piece on read the whole thing.

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