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ProPublica: With Latest Errors, Jared Kushner Has Updated His Disclosures More than 40 Times

Jared Kushner Alex BrandonAP
Alex Brandon/AP

Left-leaning investigative news outlet ProPublica reported Thursday that the latest revisions to the financial disclosure forms of White House adviser and President Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, bring the count to 40 corrections.

The latest revisions, according to the report, stem from inaccurate accounting of interest earnings of two loans from the Kushner Companies, of which Jared served as CEO before he came to the White House, to New York City real estate projects. A Kushner Companies representative confirmed to ProPublica that this income was overstated by around an order of magnitude.

Kushner’s financial disclosure forms have been the target of scrutiny and subject to continual correction since the New York real estate tycoon and husband to first daughter Ivanka Trump filed them in March of last year. Failure to disclose certain investment assets, for example, prompted a lawsuit in December by anti-Trump lawyer, Jeffrey Lovitky.

The White House adviser’s other filings have been similarly scrutinized. Most egregiously, Kushner failed to note certain meetings with foreign officials on his security clearance forms, leading to a correction and a minor scandal shortly after he joined the administration last year.

Corrections to financial disclosures are not in and of themselves improper or unusual. The latest correction, which, according to ProPublica, involved correcting an annual loan interest income amount that was greater than the principle of the loans, may have been prompted by a clerical error.

Non-profit ProPublica, which is partly funded by both leftist billionaire George Soros and tech giant Google, has become an investigative powerhouse in its decade online, breaking major stories, including those disadvantageous to Democrat politicians and Big Tech.

The news organization has relentlessly scoured Kushner and other administration officials’ paperwork. Its site has had a section dedicated to damning reports about these officials since inauguration.

Recently, ProPublica was the apparent source of explosive – and false – reports linking Gina Haspel, Trump’s pick to replace Mike Pompeo as head of the Central Intelligence Agency, to “black sites,” where inmates were subject to interrogation that has been described as torture. Haspel allegedly “mocked the prisoner’s suffering in a private conversation.” ProPublica was forced to retract these accusations. Other initiatives include teaming up with Google to root out “hate speech”  and publicly reveal “racists” on the Internet.

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