Prada Pulls Product Over ‘Blackface’ Controversy

Elite designer Prada has yanked a number of products off its shelves due to complaints over racist imagery.
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JOHN NOLTE

Elite designer Prada has yanked a number of products off its shelves due to complaints over racist imagery.

In yet another case of how clueless and out-of-touch elites are, Prada released a series of luxury trinkets — key chains, phone cases, necklaces, shirts, charms and more — that feature a design that more than resembles a monkey with large red lips, which immediately brings to mind (at least to normal people) the racist “Sambo” imagery from the early 20th century.

Prada actually put this stuff in its store window, which set off a firestorm of social media criticism:

Prada finally agreed to pull the products this week, and issued a statement saying the company is “taking immediate steps to learn from this.”

Honestly, we have the worst elites.

How does anyone become so bubbled and sheltered they miss something like this? How did no alarm bells go off?

What’s more, how did this stuff make its way through an international corporation, all the checks, double-checks, and triple-checks, without one person saying, “Uhm, are y’all out of your minds?”

Oh, wait, someone did and no one did anything about it.

According to Chinyere Ezie, a staff attorney for the Center for Constitutional Rights, “When I asked a Prada employee whether they knew they had plastered blackface imagery throughout their store, in a moment of surprising candor I was told that, *a black employee had previously complained about blackface at Prada, but he didn’t work there anymore.*”

The fact that Prada is an Italian company might help to explain how something like this could be manufactured, but not how it ended up in a SoHo store window here in the United States. Moreover, according to the far-left Washington Post, Prada’s flagship store in Milan displayed all seven of the trinkets in this particular design series, which, as a group, just looks like a bunch of anodyne characters — a rocket ship, octopus, robot, dog… When displayed with this group, the monkeys look like goofy space aliens.

For whatever reason, though, as you can see in the photos above, the SoHo store chose to focus on the monkey character, which gave the display a totally different context.

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