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Columbine Students Pledge Release of Death Photos for Gun Control

Columbine
MARK LEFFINGWELL/AFP/Getty Images
AWR HAWKINS

With April 20, 2019, marking the 20th anniversary of the Columbine attack, gun control advocates in that school are pledging the release of death photos to secure more gun laws.

Reuters reports that Kaylee Tyrner and certain of her classmates launched a campaign to get students to sign releases to have their death photos publicized should they be killed in a gun-related incident. They call the campaign #MyLastShot.

The group of students believe releasing the photos is a key part to securing more laws. They said, “The media censors those images. But if we can’t handle the reality of what our gun violence epidemic is causing, we’ll remain stuck on a loop,”

Tyrner indicates she was motivated to launch the campaign after seeing a 1955 photo of a black teenager who was hanged for allegedly “flirting with a while woman.” Tyrner  said, “The graphic images of his death revealed the realities of racism and sparked the civil rights movement. I knew that there was something huge missing from the gun violence prevention movement.”

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) is also marking the 20th anniversary of Columbine with a gun control push.

On April 19, 2019, Feinstein tweeted: “After each mass shooting, Republicans obstruct any action, even universal background checks. But I hold out hope. Student activists help inject new enthusiasm into the gun safety movement. Unlike Republican lawmakers, they’re not afraid to take on the NRA.”

AWR Hawkins is an award-winning Second Amendment columnist for Breitbart News and the writer/curator of Down Range with AWR Hawkins, a weekly newsletter focused on all things Second Amendment, also for Breitbart News. He is the political analyst for Armed American Radio. Follow him on Twitter: @AWRHawkins. Reach him directly at awrhawkins@breitbart.com. Sign up to get Down Range at breitbart.com/downrange.

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