New Virginia AG Jason Miyares Launches Investigations into Public Schools, Parole Board

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA - JANUARY 15: Jason Miyares is sworn in as the 48th Attorney General during the Inauguration for Governor-elect Glenn Youngkin on the steps of the Virginia State Capitol on January 15, 2022 in Richmond, Virginia. Miyares is the first Hispanic and Cuban American to be elected Attorney General …
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Virginia’s new Attorney General Jason Miyares (R) wasted no time Saturday, launching immediate investigations into the Virginia Parole Board and Loudoun County Public Schools.

A statement released just hours after Miyares and Republican Gov. Glenn Youngkin were sworn in detailed the nature of the probes and their part in a return to basic principles of law and order.

The move was a fulfilment of promises both men made on the campaign trail, as Breitbart News reported, when both men promised to “quickly move to protect Virginians’ freedoms.”

“One of the reasons Virginians get so fed up with government is the lack of transparency – and that’s a big issue here,” Miyares wrote.

“The Virginia Parole Board broke the law when they let out murders, rapists, and cop killers early on their sentences without notifying the victims. Loudoun County Public Schools covered up a sexual assault on school grounds for political gain, leading to an additional assault of a young girl.”

As Breitbart News reported, the final reference was to a case that saw a male student at Loudoun County’s Stone Bridge High School found guilty of sexually assaulting a female student in a girls’ bathroom in May.

People talk before the start of a rally against "critical race theory" (CRT) being taught in schools at the Loudoun County Government center in Leesburg, Virginia on June 12, 2021. - "Are you ready to take back our schools?" Republican activist Patti Menders shouted at a rally opposing anti-racism teaching that critics like her say trains white children to see themselves as "oppressors." "Yes!", answered in unison the hundreds of demonstrators gathered this weekend near Washington to fight against "critical race theory," the latest battleground of America's ongoing culture wars. The term "critical race theory" defines a strand of thought that appeared in American law schools in the late 1970s and which looks at racism as a system, enabled by laws and institutions, rather than at the level of individual prejudices. But critics use it as a catch-all phrase that attacks teachers' efforts to confront dark episodes in American history, including slavery and segregation, as well as to tackle racist stereotypes. (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP) (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images)

People talk before the start of a rally against “critical race theory” (CRT) being taught in schools at the Loudoun County Government center in Leesburg, Virginia on June 12, 2021. (ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images)

A woman sits with her sign during a Loudoun County Public Schools (LCPS) board meeting in Ashburn, Virginia on October 12, 2021. - Loudoun county school board meetings have become tense recently with parents clashing with board members over transgender issues, the teaching of critical race theory (CRT), and Covid-19 mandates. Recently tensions between groups of parents and the school board increased after parents say an allegedly transgender individual assaulted a girl at one of the schools. Earlier this month US Attorney General Merrick Garland directed federal authorities to hold strategy sessions in the next month with law enforcement to address the increasing threats targeting school board members, teachers and other employees in the nation's public schools. This in response to a request from the National School Boards Association asking US President Joe Biden for federal assistance to investigate and stop threats made over policies including mask mandates, likening the vitriol to a form of domestic terrorism.

A woman sits with her sign during a Loudoun County Public Schools (LCPS) board meeting in Ashburn, Virginia on October 12, 2021.  (ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images)

The teen suspect was found guilty on all charges but only after the offending student was transferred to another school where he allegedly raped another student and the district was accused of covering up the crime which resulted in one of the alleged victim’s parents being arrested at a school board meeting.

The offending student has been placed on the sex offenders registry for life as part of his sentence.

In addition to the investigations, Miyares notified about 30 staff members that they will no longer be employed by the office of the attorney general.

Virginia State Senator Louise Lucas tweeted that Miyares fired the “entire” civil rights division, which Miyares’s office told Fox News is not accurate.

“This is incorrect information,” Miyares spokeswoman Victoria LaCivita said. “There are 12 individuals who work in the Office of Civil Rights – only two personnel changes were made.”

Follow Simon Kent on Twitter: or e-mail to: skent@breitbart.com

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