Poll: Only 22% Say Joe Biden’s America Headed in Right Direction, Down 6 Points Since January

Joe Biden speaks about the release of US women's basketball player Brittney Griner, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, DC, on December 8, 2022. - Biden said Thursday that Griner is "on her way home" after being freed from Russia in a prisoner swap for Russian …
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

Only 22 percent of Americans believe President Joe Biden’s America is headed in the right direction, down six points since January, a CIVIQS poll found Friday.

While fewer Americans say the nation is headed in an increasingly right direction, 68 percent say it is headed in the wrong direction, up six points since January.

The CIVIQS rolling job approval average tracked 472,851 responses between January 19, 2017, and April 13, 2023. The CIVIQS tracking model is meant to capture the shifts in attitude of various groups over time across all 50 states and Washington, DC. These changes can happen either over time or rapidly.

Two major political events have occurred since January. The nation suffered a banking crisis, and former President Donald Trump was indicted by a far-left district attorney from Manhattan.

The banking crisis was caused, in part, by sharp interest rate hikes to tamp down Biden’s inflation. The Federal Reserve continued to increase interest rates in March to tamp down inflation, a decision subject to speculation by financial experts, as the central bank weighed reducing soaring inflation and the stability of the banking system.

Biden’s 40-year-high inflation, on average, cost American households an extra $5,200 last year, or $433 per month, according to Bloomberg.

Ninety percent of voters are worried about Biden’s soaring inflation, the top concern among those sampled in a March Fox News poll. Overall, 70 percent of Americans feel financially stressed in Biden’s America, a CNBC Your Money Financial Confidence survey revealed Tuesday.

After the banking crisis, Trump was indicted by Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg. This was historic, as no president or former president has ever been indicted, much less one campaigning for reelection.

A recent survey from YouGov/Yahoo found that most Americans do not think the New York grand jury’s actions will have a negative effect on Trump. Meanwhile, the former president took the lead over Biden in a hypothetical general election match-up after the indictment.

Additional polling shows the partisan nature of the indictment, according to legal experts, has not been lost on the electorate. Seventy-six percent of U.S. adult respondents believe politics influenced “the decision to indict Trump,” a CNN-commissioned poll found.

Bragg’s case has not been off to a good start. A federal court on Tuesday denied his request for a temporary restraining order to prevent House Judiciary Committee chairman Jim Jordan (R-OH) from questioning a former prosecutor about Bragg’s case against Trump.

Follow Wendell Husebø on Twitter @WendellHusebø. He is the author of Politics of Slave Morality.

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