Amazon Forces Delivery Drivers to Consent to AI Surveillance or Lose Their jobs

Jeff Bezos arrive at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party on Sunday, March 4, 2018, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Amazon delivery drivers in the U.S. are reportedly being told that they must sign “biometric consent” forms giving Amazon permission to use AI-powered cameras to track them while they work if they want to keep their jobs.

The Verge reports that Amazon is rolling out new digital sensors in its delivery vehicles across the U.S. to monitor and control the activity of its workers in efforts to improve efficiency. The firm installed machine-learning powered surveillance cameras in its delivery vans earlier this year, now the firm is telling employees they must agree to be surveilled by AI or lose their jobs.

Amazon delivery drivers in the U.S. are now being told to sign “biometric consent” forms to continue working for the e-commerce giant. The information that Amazon is collecting from workers seems to vary based on the surveillance equipment being fitted in each van, but the company’s privacy policy covers a wide range of information.

The Verge reports that drivers must consent to handing over “photographs used to verify their identity; vehicle location and movements (including ‘miles driven, speed, acceleration, braking, turns, following distance’); ‘potential traffic violations’ (like speeding, failure to stop at stop signs, and undone seatbelts); and ‘potentially risky driver behavior, such as distracted driving or drowsy driving.'”

The privacy policy can be seen below:

Amazon Privacy Policy for Vehicle Camera Technology by Lucas Nolan on Scribd


Amazon announced in February that it would start installing AI-powered cameras developed by the tech firm Netradyne in its delivery cans. The cameras record “100% of the time,” and are supposedly designed to monitor or dangerous behavior such as if a driver is checking their phone or yawning while driving.

Many drivers are upset by the new decision with one driver telling Reuters that the move was an “invasion of privacy.” Amazon Driver Henry Search told Reuters: “We are out here working all day, trying our best already. The cameras are just another way to control us.”

Read more at the Verge here.

Lucas Nolan is a reporter for Breitbart News covering issues of free speech and online censorship. Follow him on Twitter @LucasNolan or contact via secure email at the address lucasnolan@protonmail.com

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