You Have One Week to Tell Amazon Not to Share Your Internet Connection with Neighbors

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos during the JFK Space Summit at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library in Boston, Wednesday, June 19, 2019. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
AP Photo/Charles Krupa

Amazon is about to enable a new feature on Alexa and Echo devices on June 8 that will create a wireless mesh service, sharing a slice of users’ internet bandwidth with their nearby neighbors. The steps to disable this intrusive new feature from the Masters of the Universe can be found below.

Ars Technica reports that e-commerce and tech giant Amazon is introducing a new feature on June 8 that will turn existing Alexa, Echo, and other devices into a wireless mesh network that can provide nearby neighbors with access to the user’s internet connection.

On June 8, the company will enroll the devices in Amazon Sidewalk, its new wireless mesh service, sharing a part of the user’s internet bandwidth with nearby people. By default, devices including Alexa, Echo, Ring, security cams, outdoor lights, motion sensors, and Tile trackers will be enrolled in the system.

As many people are unlikely to change their default settings, millions of people will likely be automatically added to the program without knowing anything about it. The Amazon webpage for Amazon Sidewalk states that it “is currently only available in the US.”

Amazon has published a white paper detailing the technical operations and service terms that it says will protect the privacy and security of users part of the Sidewalk project. Despite these assurances, security-minded people will want to disable Amazon Sidewalk from there devices. Below are the steps needed to disable the Sidewalk features on Amazon devices:

  1. Open the Alexa app
  2. Open More and selecting Settings
  3. Select Account Settings
  4. Select Amazon Sidewalk
  5. Turn Amazon Sidewalk Off

Read more at Ars Technica here.

Lucas Nolan is a reporter for Breitbart News covering issues of free speech and online censorship. Follow him on Twitter @LucasNolan or contact via secure email at the address lucasnolan@protonmail.com

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