AP: 'Teen Immigrant Angst a Factor In Boston Bombings?'

Apparently, a YouTube channel filled with videos that include al-Qaeda's black banners and other violent  Islamist images, still has Martha Irvine of the Associated Press confused over the motives of suspected Boston Marathon bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev. How else to explain why, in her piece of psycho-babble, Irvine doesn't mention the possibility of religious extremism as a motive for a full fifteen paragraphs.

Irvine doesn't even mention the YouTube channel or Tsarnaev demanding his wife convert to Islam or the radical-attracting mosque he attended or any of the other evidence that points to Islamic extremism. In fact, other than framing the question as though it is hardly worth considering -- "Did extremist religious views play a role?" -- Irvine only  seems interested in using a terrorist attack to protect immigration reform.

The AP piece opens with a bunch of nonsensical hand-wringing over the plight of immigrants who come to America as teenagers and seem to have more trouble fitting in than their parents and younger siblings. On top of all the usual teen angst, they are also dealing with being uprooted from the only home they have ever known.

Yeah, uhm, except Tamerlan isn't suspected of placing two bombs in a crowd of innocents as an angsty teenager. He was 26 when the bombings occurred. Could "Immigration Angst" explain Dzokhar, Tamerlan's younger brother who is suspected of being a co-conspirator in the twin bombings?

Nope.

According to Irvine's "experts," Dzokhar was young enough when he arrived in America to assimilate easily.

So what exactly is the point of this article?

This:

Young immigrants who lack legal status face additional stresses. One support effort for them was a handbook for schools written by a 21-year-old Polish immigrant in Chicago, Sylvia Rusin. Among other things, the book suggests creating "safe zones" so students can openly talk about their immigration status and get support. Many of those students deal with depression and anxiety.

The Boston bombings have only added to the anxiety - by creating more anti-immigrant sentiment and potentially increasing opposition to proposals to allow more immigrants legal residence.

After about a thousand words setting up the ridiculous theory that "Immigration Angst" might create terrorists, the punchline arrives to not-too-subtlety suggest that opposition to citizenship for illegals might be creating more of that terrorist-creating "Immigration Angst."

It is not just that leftists are loathe to recognize evil and the evils of radical Islam; it is that if they do, they can no longer exploit tragedy to push their agenda -- be it gun control or immigration reform.   

All things being the same, had the suspected Boston bombers been Timothy McVeigh-types, the media would be crawling all over their church, their schools, their talk-radio idols, and their associates looking for anyone or anything that might have ever said an unkind word about the government. The media-frenzy would be unprecedented.

But because it looks as though the bombers are not who the media had hoped they would be, outlets like the AP are now forced to spend 1400 words defying logic and facts to twist reality into something they can still exploit -- while ignoring their mosque, their school, and their associates.  

 

Follow John Nolte on Twitter @NolteNC               

 


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