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In Police vs. Beyoncé, The Loser Is Black Americans

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There’s good news for Beyonce and bad news for Beyonce.

First, the good news: Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan – you remember that guy, the one who reportedly calls Jews “bloodsuckers” and white people “white devils” – has now pledged to defend Queen Bey from the vicissitudes of the police. Referencing Beyonce’s halftime show at the Super Bowl, during which the feminist icon shook her scantily-clad feminist rump along with a coterie of black backup dancers wearing Black Panthers outfits while singing about the evils of the cops, Farrakhan stated, “She started talking all that black stuff…and white folks were like, ‘We don’t know how to deal with that.’” Farrakhan similarly slammed former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani: “Look at how you treatin’ Beyonce now. You gonna picket. You not gonna offer her police protection. But the FOI [Fruit of Islam] will.”

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Then there’s the bad news: cops around America are now stating that they want Beyonce to apologize to them. According to TMZ, “We’re told [NYPD] cops are bitter and want her to publicly disavow violence or any other type of aggression toward police.” The New York Sergeants Benevolent Association told CBS News, “As a celebrity figure Beyonce should take greater responsibility in her divisive actions that further complicate relationships between communities of color and the members of law enforcement.”

Meanwhile, in Miami, Javier Ortiz with the Miami Fraternal Order of Police said, “We’re not going to put up with her anti-police message.” The Nashville Fraternal Order of Police stated, “We ask officers to refuse to support the efforts of artists who promote a false narrative of law enforcement attacks on black citizens.” The Dallas Police Association said they wouldn’t formally boycott Beyonce, but they were certain that “many Arlington officers will most certainly decide against working security for Beyonce’s May concert in their city….We are appalled at her attack on law enforcement during her Super Bowl performance.”

Beyonce, of course, doesn’t truly need to worry about the police blowback – she and her former drug dealer husband are massively wealthy, and her concert bookers can afford to hire private security (in fact, there’s no reason that the taxpayers should foot the bill for her concert security). She’s also wealthy enough that she doesn’t have to worry about the critical lack of police manpower in black communities, which ends in lower rates of solved homicides, higher rates of crime, and higher rates of poverty. She can mouth off all she wants about the evil racist cops without ever having to feel the effects of her words.

In the end, it’s black communities that will suffer. Black communities will suffer from increased crime rates. In December, Heather MacDonald wrote in The Wall Street Journal that in 25 of the nation’s largest 30 cities, the “projected increase for homicides in 2015…is 11%.” That could actually underestimate the problem by five percent, according to the FiveThirtyEight data blog. Last October, FBI Director James Comey admitted, “Most of America’s 50 largest cities have seen an increase in homicides and shootings this year, and many of them have seen a huge increase.” MacDonald attributes these increases to the so-called Ferguson Effect: cops backing off from aggressive policing out of fear of political consequences.

So, should the cops tell Beyonce to stick it? Of course they should. The sad thing is that black communities aren’t doing the same, given that her elitist anti-cop claptrap bears poisonous fruit for black Americans more than anyone else.

Ben Shapiro is Senior Editor-At-Large of Breitbart News, Editor-in-Chief of DailyWire.com, and The New York Times bestselling author, most recently, of the book, The People vs. Barack Obama: The Criminal Case Against The Obama Administration (Threshold Editions, June 10, 2014). Follow Ben Shapiro on Twitter @benshapiro.


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