‘Bones Ground to Powder’: Xi Jinping Threatens Gruesome Death for Hong Kong, Taiwan

Chinese President Xi Jinping attends a signing ceremony following the talks with his Kyrgyz counterpart in Bishkek on June 13, 2019. (Photo by Vyacheslav OSELEDKO / AFP) (Photo credit should read VYACHESLAV OSELEDKO/AFP/Getty Images)
VYACHESLAV OSELEDKO/AFP/Getty

Chinese dictator Xi Jinping threatened anti-communist dissidents with a gruesome death in remarks Sunday during a visit to Nepal, warning that anyone defying China’s illegal territorial claims will have “their bodies smashed and bones ground to powder.”

Xi’s barbaric remarks follow the revelation that the Communist Party, under his orders, is razing ancient Uyghur cemeteries in western China and leaving sprawling empty lots full of broken shards of bones, the remains of those hastily exhumed in the process of destroying the graveyards.

Xi appeared to be directing his wrath towards “separatists” in Taiwan – a sovereign nation that Xi claims as a breakaway province – and Hong Kong, an autonomous region where Xi’s puppets have repeatedly attempted to break the law to impose Communist Party dogma.

The Agence-France Presse (AFP), whose reporters also personally witnessed the desecrated bone fields on Xinjiang, noted that Nepal is home to a significant Tibetan exile community, who Xi also appeared to threaten. The Tibetans, ethnically and religiously distinct from the Han Chinese, have attempted to liberate themselves from communism unsuccessfully for decades. Chen Quanguo, Xinjiang’s current top Communist Party official, moved there after brutally crushing Buddhist movements in Tibet.

“Anyone who attempts to split any region from China will perish, with their bodies smashed and bones ground to powder,” the Chinese Foreign Ministry quoted Xi as stating in Nepal, where he landed this weekend following a meeting with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in Chennai. “Any external forces that support the splitting of China can only be regarded as delusional by the Chinese people.”

Prior to Xi arriving in India, Indian authorities arrested at least nine ethnic Tibetan exiles, some but not all confirmed as activists, to prevent them from freely speaking out against the abuses of the Chinese Communist Party.

Xinhua, the Chinese state news agency, modified Xi’s remarks to sound less violent.

“Anyone attempting separatist activities in any part of China will be crushed and any external force backing such attempts will be deemed by the Chinese people as pipe-dreaming,” Xinhua quoted Xi as saying.

The state propaganda agency emphasized Xi’s comments calling for deeper trade cooperation with Nepal. The article did not mention China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), its global domination plan through predatory lending and infrastructure development, but Xi did reportedly mention projects that belong to the BRI, such as China’s proposal to “upgrade” Nepal’s highways and train systems and the “Trans-Himalayan Multi-Dimensional Connectivity Network.”

Xi’s threat to turn the bones of people seeking freedom into dust follow an alarming speech on the morbid anniversary of Communist Party rule in China on October 1.

“We must uphold the principles of ‘Peaceful Reunification’ and ‘One Country, Two Systems,’ maintain lasting prosperity and stability in Hong Kong and Macao, promote the peaceful development of cross-Strait relations, unite all Chinese sons and daughters, and continue to strive for the motherland’s complete reunification,” Xi said following his march in a parade featuring multiple gigantic floats featuring his likeness, eclipsing the image of Mao Zedong hanging above Tiananmen Square.

“One Country, Two Systems” is an agreement between China and Hong Kong that bans Hong Kong from seeking independence but bans China from imposing communism. Xi’s insistent attempts at violating the policy have triggered a wave of protests in the city that just entered its 20th week. Xi has called for Taiwan to allow itself to be annexed and governed like Hong Kong, an offer the sovereign nation has repeatedly rejected.

Xi’s call to “unite all Chinese sons and daughters” also included the imposition of his rule on ethnic Han Chinese people outside of “mainland China.” Chinese operatives have repeatedly used violence to silence dissent in free countries such as Australia and New Zealand and Xi has imposed himself using the military in the South China Sea, illegally squatting in territory belonging to Taiwan, Brunei, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Malaysia.
Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen responded to Xi’s National Day speech during the celebrations honoring the establishing of a free Taiwan last week.

“We are witnessing China’s rise and expansion, as they challenge free, democratic values and the global order through a combination of authoritarianism, nationalism, and economic might,” Tsai said. “As the strategic forefront of the Indo-Pacific region, Taiwan has become the first line of defense for democratic values.”

“China is encroaching on us through their sharp power, but as a crucial member of the region, we know that Taiwan must fulfill its responsibilities to the international community. We will not act provocatively or rashly; rather, we will work with like-minded countries to ensure that the peaceful and stable cross-strait status quo is not unilaterally altered,” she added.

 Protests continued against Xi in Hong Kong this weekend, undeterred by his threat to crush them. Protesters have made five demands of their government: the full withdrawal of a bill that would allow extradition to China; freedom for political prisoners; an independent investigation into police brutality; direct election of lawmakers; and an end to being called “rioters.” Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam promised to push the legislature to withdraw the extradition bill but has ignored the other demands. This month, she imposed a ban on face coverings in the region, as protesters often need gas masks to protect from the police’s use of tear gas to injure protesters.

Thousands took the streets on Saturday and Sunday wearing masks. Some, as protest leader Joshua Wong noted in a photo on Twitter, covered their faces with masks of Xi Jinping, directly challenging the head of the Party.

Follow Frances Martel on Facebook and Twitter.

 

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