Report: Abortion Accounts for 61% of Black Deaths in America

Mario Tama/Getty Images
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Induced abortion is the leading cause of death in the United States and accounts for a disturbing 61 percent of deaths of African Americans, according to researchers from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

A report Thursday analyzed research using data from the latest year for which all the pertinent information is available (2009) and found that induced abortion was responsible for 1.152 million deaths, making it the number one cause of death in the U.S. at nearly twice the number of deaths from heart disease (599,413) and cancer (567,628).

While abortion accounted for nearly a third of all U.S. deaths in 2009 (32.1 percent), more troubling still, it made up 61.1 percent of African American deaths, according to the study published in the Open Journal of Preventive Medicine (June 2016).

The ongoing disparity of black deaths through abortion has led one leading black pastor to recently decry the “black genocide” taking place in the United States at the hands of the abortion industry.

In his July essay, the Rev. Clenard Childress, Jr. noted that 52 percent of all African American pregnancies end in abortion and that whereas abortion is the most common operation performed on women, it is also “the least regulated medical procedure” and is often “completely ignored by health regulation enforcement.”

Statistics reveal that nearly 1,800 unborn black babies are aborted every day, proportionately more than any other race, Rev. Childress observed.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), between 2007 and 2010, more than 35 percent of the deaths by abortion in the United States happened to black babies, despite the fact that blacks represent only 12.8 percent of the population. Conversely, non-Hispanic whites, who make up 63.7% of America’s population, account for only 37.7% of all U.S. abortions.

Whatever the intent of abortion practitioners, by functional standards, abortion is a racist institution in the United States, with black children aborted at nearly four times the rate of white children.

Among white women, there are 138 abortions for every 1000 live births; among blacks, there are 501 abortions for every 1000 births. This means that blacks are aborted at 3.6 times the rate of whites.

Carried over to a global context, the figures are equally worrisome, with abortion accounting for more deaths than any other cause.

As of August 4, 2018, there have been nearly 25 million abortions performed worldwide so far this year, while less than a million people have died from road accident fatalities, 4.8 million from cancer, and 990,000 from HIV/AIDS, according to the best available data.

In their study, the UNC-Charlotte researchers, James Studnicki, Sharon J. MacKinnon, and John W. Fisher, lamented the fact that despite the overwhelming weight of data and the universal acknowledgement that the act of abortion results in a human death, abortion is often not reported as a cause of death in the vital statistics system in the United States, an omission stemming from ideology rather than science.

“The exclusion of a major cause of death,” they noted, “especially one with large racial and ethnic disparities, should be a major concern to the scientific community and society as a whole.”

“As a cause of death, the major one for Hispanics and African Americans,” said Dr. Studnicki, the lead researcher, “abortion would be at the top of the scientific agenda in the U.S., and with a funding priority consistent with its importance.”

Follow Thomas D. Williams on Twitter

.