15 Dead in Russia School Shooting Despite ‘Restrictive’ Gun Control

People gather to lay flowers, put toys and light candles in memory of victims of the shooting at school No. 88 in Izhevsk, Russia, Monday, Sept. 26, 2022. Authorities say a gunman has killed 15 people and wounded 24 others in a school in central Russia. According to officials, 11 …
AP Photo/Sergei Kuznetsov

Fifteen people were killed and 24 wounded during a school shooting in Russia on Monday despite that country’s “restrictive” gun control policies.

The attack occurred in “School No. 88 in Izhevsk,” which is approximately 600 miles east of Moscow, and “educates children between grades one and 11,” the Associated Press reported .

The gunman was identified as a 34-year-old who was a past graduate of School No. 88.

Among the 15 killed, 11 were children. Among the 24 wounded, 22 were children.

A woman hugs a boy surrounded by other people near the scene of a shooting in school No88 in Izhevsk on September 26, 2022. - The death toll has risen to 13 people, including seven children, after a man opened fire on September 26 at his former school in central Russia, authorities said. - Russia OUT (Photo by Maria BAKLANOVA / Kommersant Photo / AFP) / Russia OUT (Photo by MARIA BAKLANOVA/Kommersant Photo/AFP via Getty Images)

A woman hugs a boy surrounded by other people near the scene of a shooting in school No88 in Izhevsk on September 26, 2022. (MARIA BAKLANOVA/Kommersant Photo/AFP via Getty Images)

The governor of Udmurtia, Alexander Brechalov, said in a video statement that the gunman shot himself after carrying out the heinous attack, Breitbart News noted.

The University of Sydney’s GunPolicy.org lists Russia’s gun control as “restrictive.”  There is no right to gun ownership in Russia and government approval is required in order to own the firearms approved for private possession.

Policemen walk near the scene of a shooting in school No88 in Izhevsk on September 26, 2022. - The death toll has risen to 13 people, including seven children, after a man opened fire on September 26 at his former school in central Russia, authorities said. - Russia OUT (Photo by Maria BAKLANOVA / Kommersant Photo / AFP) / Russia OUT (Photo by MARIA BAKLANOVA/Kommersant Photo/AFP via Getty Images)

Policemen walk near the scene of a shooting in school No88 in Izhevsk on September 26, 2022. (MARIA BAKLANOVA/Kommersant Photo/AFP via Getty Images)

For example, handguns are banned from private ownership, as are automatic rifles and pistols. Certain rifles and shotguns may be owned, but private citizens must acquire a firearm license in order to own them.

The process for acquiring “a firearm license in Russia must pass a background check which considers criminal, mental health, and medical records.” Moreover, a firearm license is only valid for five years, after which time a license holder must “re-apply and re-qualify.”

All privately owned firearms are registered with the government in Russia, and records are kept on all ammunition purchases.

Russia also has “written specifications for the lawful safe storage of private firearms and ammunition by licensed gun owners.”

Russia also has gun controls governing the transport of firearms, the number of firearms a individually may legally own, and the prohibitions against the public carry of firearms, whether open or concealed.

AWR Hawkins is an award-winning Second Amendment columnist for Breitbart News and the writer/curator of Down Range with AWR Hawkinsa weekly newsletter focused on all things Second Amendment, also for Breitbart News. He is the political analyst for Armed American Radio and a Turning Point USA Ambassador. AWR Hawkins holds a PhD in Military History with a focus on the Vietnam War (brown water navy), U.S. Navy since Inception, the Civil War, and Early Modern Europe. Follow him on Instagram: @awr_hawkins. You can sign up to get Down Range at breitbart.com/downrange. Reach him directly at awrhawkins@breitbart.com.

COMMENTS

Please let us know if you're having issues with commenting.