Arizona Governor Won’t Definitively Say if He Will Mandate Coronavirus Vaccine

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey speaks at a news conference with U.S. Census Director Steven Dillingham and other state leaders to urge Arizonans to participate in the nation's once-a-decade census population count Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020, in Phoenix. Ending the 2020 census at the end of September instead of the end …
Ross D. Franklin/AP Photo

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey (R) last week refused to definitively say whether he would require Arizonans to get a vaccine for the Chinese coronavirus once it is ready and available, explaining that he wants to see “the maximum level of compliance.”

The governor’s explanation coincides with reports that the state could see what has been described as “hundreds of thousands” of doses of a vaccine by the month’s end.

Last week, a reporter asked the Republican governor to explain if he would require Arizonians to get a vaccine for the novel coronavirus, but Ducey waffled, failing to answer the question directly.

“I agree with you that there’s a lot of rumors going around. But what we want to do is make sure we’re communicating the facts to the people of Arizona and much like masks, we want to see the maximum level of compliance,” Ducey began, articulating his view that the vaccinations are “our road back to a normal life.”

“A safe life where we are protected and where our loved ones are protected. Where our kids are back in schools, and where our small businesses are operating. Where our doctors and nurses have more of a realistic work-life balance,” the Republican said.

“Dr. Fauci of the Coronavirus Task Force actually says that the skepticism around these vaccinations has come down quite a bit with the messaging that’s been happening over the last several weeks with the partnership with the private sector and that there’s an expectation that we can reach 70 percent levels of vaccination, which would be very positive,” he continued, explaining that the primary objective remains on building confidence “in the system.”

“And we are going to begin with people that are going to be standing in line, rolling their sleeves up saying I will take this vaccination because they’re the ones caring and comforting the folks that are infected,” he explained, adding, “But it will be very much a public service announcement, public education, public engagement priority, and it’s going to happen across the country and around the world.”

Rep. Andy Biggs (R-AZ) said the answer left him “wondering if the Governor intends to coerce vaccinations, and whether the State Legislature will let him”:

The buzz surrounding vaccine mandates has risen to the forefront in recent days. Wales’ left-wing health minister, for example, recently announced that the government will “be handing out credit card-sized vaccine passports to those who have received the jab,” as Breitbart News reported:

In a statement, Mr Gething said: “Those receiving a COVID-19 [Chinese coronavirus] vaccination will be given a credit card-sized NHS Wales immunisation card which will have the vaccine name, date of immunisation and batch number of each of the doses given handwritten on them.”

The announcement comes amidst concerns that British businesses will begin requiring proof of vaccination as a condition of patrons entering their establishments after the UK’s new vaccine minister Nadim Zahawi said on Monday that venues may bar people from entering without an immunity passport.

Meanwhile, the British government is rumored to be introducing vaccine stamps in passports in the next year, as some airlines, such as the Australian airliner Qantas, indicate that they will require individuals to wield the stamps in order to travel.

However, not all U.S. leaders are dodging the questions on mandating the vaccination. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) recently assured Floridians that “no one will be mandated to take the vaccine.”

“This will be available, but not mandated,” he said.

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