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Five Things to Watch For at the G-20 Summit

The G-20 summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Friday and Saturday could be the scene of a few momentous encounters as world leaders meet – or refuse to meet – and major strategic conflicts play out. Here are five things to watch for as the summit unfolds.

The USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier arrived in Hong Kong waters at a time of heightened tensions between Washington and Beijing

China Allows U.S. Aircraft Carrier to Visit Hong Kong

The aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan and its battle group arrived in Hong Kong on Wednesday, a friendship visit widely interpreted as an easing of tensions between the U.S. and China just a few weeks after the Chinese refused to allow a U.S. warship to dock in Hong Kong.

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands with China's President Xi Jinping on the sidelines of a summit last month, as ties between the world's second and third largest economies gradually thaw

Japan’s Abe and China’s Xi Agree to Strengthen Ties

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe met with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Beijing on Friday and agreed to strengthen bilateral relations. “We confirmed that we are cooperative partners and absolutely do not pose a threat to each other,” Abe said after the meeting.

Russia's President Vladimir Putin reviews a military honour guard with Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping during a welcoming ceremony outside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing

China Joins Russia for Massive Wargame as Xi Meets with Putin

Russia’s biggest military exercise since the end of the Cold War is now underway, with a sizable contingent of elite Chinese and Mongolian troops participating. Chinese President Xi Jinping met with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Vladivostok on Tuesday for a bilateral summit on the sidelines of the Eastern Economic Forum.

A worker at the China Petroleum & Chemical Corp. (Sinopec) Yanshan refinery escorts journalists in Beijing.

China Blinks in Trade War, Drops Oil from Retaliatory U.S. Tariff List

The latest broadside fired by China in its trade war with the United States was a list of $16 billion in American imports subjected to a 25 percent retaliatory tariff. One major item that was supposed to be on the list was quietly removed: oil. Analysts wonder if this conspicuous omission is a sign China is blinking in its economic staredown against the Trump administration.

Chinese President Xi Jinping attends a summit at the Belt and Road Forum on May 15, 2017 in Beijing, China. The Belt and Road Forum focuses on the One Belt, One Road (OBOR) trade initiative. (Photo by Thomas Peter - Pool/Getty Images)

Trade War with U.S. Opens Rift in Chinese Leadership

Several sources close to the Chinese government said an escalating trade war with the United States is creating serious divisions in Beijing, all the way up to the office of the seemingly unassailable President Xi Jinping, according to a Reuters report Thursday.

China's President Xi Jinping (L) and US President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Exclusive – David P. Goldman: Tariffs Are Not Enough to Beat China; U.S. Needs to ‘Seize Technological Leadership’

Columnist and author David P. Goldman discussed the trade war with China with SiriusXM hosts Rebecca Mansour and Joel Pollak on Tuesday’s Breitbart News Tonight. Although he is a supporter of President Donald Trump and believes China presents “the most dire problem we face in the world,” he warned the administration may be underestimating China’s economic strength.