Fewer than One in Five Foreign Rapists Deported from Sweden

Only 19 per cent of foreign rapists registered as Swedish residents were deported from the troubled Scandinavian country between 2010 and 2014, according to government figures.

The Dail Mail reports that deportations of those convicted of child rape were even lower, at 13 per cent.  The figure for migrants convicted of aggravated child rape was not significantly higher, at just 17 per cent.

Leniency towards foreign nationals convicted of rape and aggravated rape of adults was somewhat less common, although 37 per cent and 28 per cent of migrants convicted of those crimes respectively avoided expulsion.

Deportation rates for foreign nationals who had not been registered as Swedish residents were higher.

Nonetheless,some 48 per cent of illegal migrants convicted of child rape were allowed to remain in the country.

In cases of aggravated child rape committed by non-registered persons, deportations were more likely, but 33 per cent of convicts were still able to stay.

According to the report, the “stand-out statistics” break down as follows:

  • 19 per cent of foreign nationals registered as Swedish residents convicted of rape were deported;
  • 19 per cent of foreign nationals registered as Swedish residents convicted of aggravated rape were deported;
  • 13 per cent of foreign nationals registered as Swedish residents convicted of child rape were deported; and
  • 17 per cent of foreign nationals registered as Swedish residents convicted of aggravated rape of a child were deported.

The figures emerge shortly after five “child migrants” from Afghanistan were convicted of beating and raping a boy at knifepoint after dragging him into the woods in Gottsunda, Uppsala, posting a recording of the attack on social media.

The court denied the prosecution’s request to deport, deciding the rapists “would be hit very hard by the expulsion”. They were handed custodial terms of between 12 and 15 months.

Rapes and gang rapes of young boys and teenagers in Sweden, often by men with Afghan roots, is a topic the mainstream media in Sweden has recently become willing to discuss.

Institutional abuse of young boys in Afghanistan – by members of the Afghan National Police in particular – was exposed as an intractable cultural problem for Western forces tasked with nation-building in This Is What Winning Looks Like, a 2013 documentary by British journalist Ben Anderson.

Follow Jack Montgomery on Twitter: @JackBMontgomery


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