Death of Peter Sutherland, Mass Migration Advocate Dubbed ‘Father of Globalisation’

Peter Sutherland, the notorious mass migration and multiculturalism campaigner dubbed the ‘father of globalisation’, has died.

Sutherland, 71, was a key player on a host of globalist bodies and multinational corporations, including the European Commission, the World Trade Organization (WTO), and Goldman Sachs, throughout his life.

As the United Nations Special Representative for Migration and non-executive chairman of Goldman Sachs International in 2012, he infamously remarked that the European Union should “be doing its best to undermine” the sense of national “homogeneity” in Britain and Europe, in order to pave the way for “multicultural states”.

“The United States, or Australia and New Zealand, are migrant societies and therefore they accommodate more readily those from other backgrounds than we do ourselves, who still nurse a sense of our homogeneity and difference from others,” he told the House of Lords.

“And that’s precisely what the European Union, in my view, should be doing its best to undermine.”

The Ireland-born globalist argued that the supposed threat of an ageing population was the “key argument … for the development of multicultural states”, and that the EU should push mass migration “however difficult it may be to explain this to the citizens”.

Sutherland had previously served on the bloc’s unelected executive as European Commissioner for Competition from 1985 to 1989.

Sutherland is a celebrated figure among neoliberals and hardline free traders for his work presiding over the Uruguay Round negotiations of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), the predecessor to the WTO.

This saw tariffs on agriculture, textiles, services, and so on reduced, and new rules on international arbitration and intellectual property introduced.

Corporates and idealistic free marketeers were overjoyed, with figures like the pioneering Brexit campaigner Sir James Goldsmith serving as lonely voices for economic nationalism.

The GATT did increase economic activity worldwide, and the European Commission took the unusual step of personally rebuking Sir James, asserting that “all economic activity is productive” — regardless of the impact of mass outsourcing of industry and manufacturing to sweatshop economies on working-class communities.

The entrepreneur disagreed, complaining that the “politicians and technocrats who govern us … concentrate their political, economic and social programmes on initiatives whose principal purpose is to make GNP grow quantitatively, without regard to its impact on society”/

Sir James further observed that globalists like Sutherland seemed unable “to distinguish between a nation and a commercial enterprise”.

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