Kurdish Demonstrators Protest Across France over Turkish Actions in Syria

A woman holds a flag with the portrait of Kurdish leader Abdullah Ocalan during a demonstration in Strasbourg, eastern France, on February 16, 2019, to mark 20 years since the arrest of Ocalan, who is jailed in Turkey. - Labelled the "nemesis" of the Turkish state, Ocalan remains a revered …
SEBASTIEN BOZON/AFP/Getty Images

Kurdish activists in France are protesting against the Turkish incursion into northern Syria across several French cities after tense scenes unfolded between Kurds and police in Paris.

The Democratic Council of Kurds in France advertised the protests writing, “Let’s raise our voices loudly to denounce the fascist aggression of Turkey against Rojava. Reminder of mobilization throughout France this week to defend the Rojava against the Turkish invasion.”

“The Turkish invasion is synonymous with massacres, ethnic cleansing, humanitarian drama. It will bog down Syria in an even deeper war and cause a mass exodus,” the group added in a statement

On Thursday, pro-Kurdish protestors marched in Marseille, flying flags of the YPG militia, along with flags bearing the image of Abdullah Ocalan, the leader and one of the founders of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), considered a left-wing terrorist group and proscribed in the United Kingdom. 

Salih Azad, spokesperson of the Kurdish Democratic Centre of Marseille attended the protest and told French media, “The international community can and must mobilize more to stop the genocide of the Kurdish people. We really condemn the attitude of the Americans who stabbed the Kurds in the back!”

In Paris, tensions between protestors and police were high on Thursday evening as video footage showed protestors with PKK leader Ocalan flags face-off with officers.

Another video of the protest showed more protestors carrying PKK flags, with French journalist Remy Buisine noting that members of the climate change alarmist group Extinction Rebellion were also present at the demonstration.

The United Kingdom is not the only European Union member-state to have designated the PKK a terrorist organisation. Earlier this year, Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz also banned the symbols of the group, including its flags.  

In Germany, the PKK, along with their alt-left extremist Antifa allies, have been linked to the firebombing of Turkish-run mosques, while in France PKK members were arrested in Marseille for financing terrorism in 2010 and six more PKK members were arrested in 2012 after an assassination attempt

Turkish leader has vowed to “open the gates” for millions of illegal migrants to enter Europe if the European Union dares to brand his operations in Syria an invasion.

Follow Chris Tomlinson on Twitter at @TomlinsonCJ or email at ctomlinson(at)breitbart.com

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