Nolte: McCain Family’s #ActsOfCivility Campaign Is Stupid

In this Aug. 25, 2009 file photo, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., holds a healthcare town hall meeting in Sun City, Ariz. McCain's family says the Arizona senator has chosen to discontinue medical treatment for brain cancer. (AP Photo/Matt York)
AP Photo/Matt York

John McCain’s family intends to honor the first anniversary of the U.S. senator’s death with something stupid called the #ActsOfCivility campaign.

According to the far-left Axios, “Examples from organizers include opening a dialogue with a competitor, committing to working with a colleague or peer with a different perspective and calling a family member you disagree with — and pledging to listen.”

A spokesman for the McCain Institute told the Hill, “My family and I are going out of our way to properly meet our (not so) new neighbors, who on the face of it we have little in common with.”

This is the dumbest thing ever, not to mention wildly hypocritical.

Do we really need a lecture about civility from John McCain’s widow, Cindy, who racially profiled a family, accused them of being human traffickers, and then lied and said they were guilty, all to self-aggrandize?

Do we really need a lecture about civility from The Great White View Screecher?

Do we really need a lecture about civility from a family that is so small and bitter they turned a national funeral into a disgusting and divisive campaign rally against the sitting U.S. president and his supporters?

And this is just typical of the McCains, to pervert a virtue, in this case “civility,” into an ego trip, into an effort to feel superior to us slobs, to get on TV, to speak down to everyone else because they are just so above it all.

John McCain perfected this, the art of weaponizing virtues. His cynical ability to twist words like “honor” into an imperious spear that would win him and his insatiable ego a positive mention in the left-wing media was always his go-to move.

And look at what most of this lame campaign centers on: imposing ourselves on others to make ourselves feel better about ourselves.

  • “opening a dialogue with a competitor”
  • “calling a family member you disagree with — and pledging to listen”
  • “My family and I are going out of our way to properly meet our (not so) new neighbors[.]”

How about just leaving these people the hell alone?

We’re supposed to honor the anniversary of McCain’s death by being a pain in someone’s ass?

Where is the virtue in imposing yourself on others just to make yourself feel good?

And why does it always work this way with establishment Republicans who adore the establishment media…?

Have you noticed that?

Their idea of virtue, of nobility, is always a peacocking act of public surrender.

How about if we honor John McCain with a day where we agree to stick by our principles, hold tight to our beliefs and what we believe is right, no matter how much pressure is brought down on us, no matter how many friends we lose, no matter how angry the fake news media get…?

How about a day like that?

You know, like repealing Obamacare…

Oh, wait:

Or a day where we agree to stop grinding axes, holding grudges, and move on for the good for the country…?

Oh, wait:

Or a day where we don’t snub those who have been unfailingly loyal, just to appease the elite.

Oh, wait.

Or a day where we pledge not to allow our envy and jealousy to push us to a point where we spread vicious lies about each other…?

Oh, wait.

Or a day where we don’t leak smears about black men who dare to have minds of their own…?

Oh, wait.

The horrible McCain family needs to sit down.

Follow John Nolte on Twitter @NolteNC. Follow his Facebook Page here.

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