Polio

Taliban Launches Spring Jihad Campaign amid Peace Talks

Taliban narco-jihadists on Friday announced the launch of their “Victory” spring offensive amid ongoing U.S.-led efforts to convince the terrorist group to agree to a political settlement with Kabul to end the more than 17-year-old war in Afghanistan.

Security forces guard a military convoy near Kandahar, Afghanistan. The Taliban said Friday it's planning a spring offensive as a response to a similar plan by the Kabul government. File Photo by Matiullah/UPI

U.N. Program: Polio Thriving on ‘Unchecked’ Afghanistan-Pakistan Border

The United Nations-backed Global Polio Eradication Initiative attributed a recent resurgence of the potentially deadly disease in the Afghanistan-Pakistan region, home to the one the debilitating virus’ last remaining bastions in the world, to the “unchecked” flow of people across their mutual border, the Guardian reported Wednesday.

Thee new cases of polio have been recorded in Syria, the WHO says, blaming under-immunisation in the war-wracked country. Vaccination -- like this in Afghanistan -- is simple and relatively cheap

Taliban Changes Tune on Polio, Joins WHO Vaccination Campaign

The Afghanistan-Pakistan region is considered to be the last frontier for efforts to eradicate naturally-occurring polio cases, and the Taliban, a terrorist group that operates in both countries, has joined the final fight against the crippling and potentially deadly infectious disease.

AP Photo/Abdul Khaleq

Red Cross: Water Shortage May Prompt ‘Big Health Epidemics’ in Syria

The International Committee of the Red Cross is warning that denial of water supplies as a weapon of war could trigger an “epidemic” of any number of diseases in Syria, where the Islamic State (ISIS/ISIL/IS) continues to battle for territory against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s troops and an array of rebel fighters.

ABD DOUMANY/AFP/Getty Images

Sierra Leone: Mothers Refuse to Vaccinate Children for Fear of Resurgent Ebola

Doctors in Port Loko, a northwestern region of Sierra Leone outside Freetown, are reporting a significant drop in the number of mothers bringing their children to hospitals for routine vaccinations. The mothers, they say, fear exposing their children to a resurgent Ebola virus, and in keeping them from hospitals are risking triggering the spread of polio or measles.

The Associated Press