United Airlines Denies Passenger’s Request to Bring ‘Emotional Support Peacock’ on Flight

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A woman is crying foul after United Airlines denied her request to bring her emotional support peacock aboard a flight leaving from Newark Liberty International Airport this week.

The woman, who has not been identified, claimed that she purchased another ticket for her feathered friend when the airline turned down her request, Fox News reported.

A United Airlines spokesperson, however, claimed that the woman had been warned that her peacock would not be allowed on board.

“This animal did not meet guidelines for a number of reasons, including its weight and size. We explained this to the customers on three separate occasions before they arrived at the airport,” United Airlines announced in a statement.

The travel talk show called The Jet Set shared photos and a video of the woman taking her peacock into the airport. The photos and video have already been shared hundreds of times on Facebook.

“I’m not kidding, this woman is wrangling her peacock into the airport,” another woman can be heard saying over the video. “That just happened. What the hell, New York?”

Airline representatives and disability support advocates met in 2016 to establish guidelines for passengers who wish to bring their therapy animals on their flights.

Since that meeting took place, airlines have been reevaluating their policies on bringing emotional support animals on board flights.

Delta Airlines announced January 19 that as of March 1, 2018, any passengers flying with emotional support animals must provide vaccination records, proof of animal training, and a health form signed off by a veterinarian to the airline with at least 48 hours notice.

Under the new policy, Delta would also deny boarding to any exotic emotional support animals, including ferrets, insects, or hooved animals.

United announced that they are considering a similar policy, telling Fox News that they are reevaluating their existing policy on emotional support animals.

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