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Marita Noon

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Oil jumpjack (Hasan Jamali / Associated Press)

El Niño, La Niña, and Natural Gas

Death Valley, California, is known as “the hottest place on earth.” But, if you hear the news that the “Hottest Place on Earth Has Record-Breaking Hot June”—when “temperatures exceeded average June temperatures by about 6 °F”—it might be easy to ascribe the heat to alarmist claims of climate change. As Southern California experienced power outages due to a heat wave, Death Valley hit 126 °F—though the previous June high reached 129 °F on June 30, 2013, and it holds the highest officially recorded temperature on the planet: 134 °F on July 10, 1913.

Under the Paris Agreement, 195 nations vowed to hold average global warming to well under two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), and even 1.5 C if possible

Climate Change Activists Clamp Down on Free Speech and Scientific Inquiry

Climate change activists have been secretly coordinating with one another regarding ways to prosecute individuals, organizations, and companies that are their ideological foes. They met to develop a strategy to use RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act), which was intended to provide stronger weapons for prosecuting organized crime, against those who speak out against the Obama administration’s war on fossil fuels.

US electricity utilities Great Plains Energy and Westar Energy plan to merge

Brexit’s energy lesson for California, et al

“California’s largest utility and environmental groups announced a deal Tuesday [June 21] to shutter the last nuclear power plant in the state.” This statement from the Associated Press reporting about the announced closure of the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant

climate change

Who Wants Wind Turbines Besides Crony Capitalists?

Last month’s wind-turbine fire near Palm Springs, California, that dropped burning debris on the barren ground below serves as a reminder of just one of the many reasons why people don’t want to live near the towering steel structures.

Getty Images

Greenpeace Named in a Civil RICO Suit

When the name Resolute was chosen in 2011, after the merger of Bowater and Abitibi-Consolidated, the Canadian company likely didn’t know what a harbinger it was. Today, the leader in the forest products industry and the largest producer of newsprint in the world stands alone, set in purpose, with firmness and determination. Displaying the rare courage to stand up to the typical environmental extremist campaign of misinformation and shaming designed to shut it down, Resolute Forest Products fights back.

AP Photo

EPA Requires More Ethanol Into Less Gasoline

The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS)—also known as the ethanol mandate—was passed by Congress in 2005 and expanded in 2007. Regardless of market conditions, it required ever-increasing quantities of biofuel be blended into the nation’s gasoline supply—though the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) does have the flexibility to make some adjustments based on conditions, such as availability and infrastructure. At the time of its passage, it was unfathomable that a decade later Americans would be consuming less gasoline, not more.

Nigel Roddis / Getty Images

Colorado Supreme Court Rejects Fear Mongering of Environmentalists

On May 2 a unanimous Colorado Supreme Court decision declared Fort Collins and Longmont’s limits on fracking “invalid and unenforceable” because state law trumps the local ordinances. Several states, including Colorado’s neighbors, New Mexico and Texas, have faced similar anti-oil-and-gas initiatives that have also been shot down.

AP Photo

What’s Up with Prices at the Pump and Why It Could Be a Good Sign

All of us loved less-than $2 a gallon at the pump. AAA reports: “Americans paid cheapest quarterly gas prices in 12 years”—which resulted in savings of nearly $10 billion compared to the same period last year. However, oil (and, therefore gasoline) has been creeping upward since the February low—topping $45 a barrel, a high for the year. And that could be a good thing.

John Kerry Grandaughter APMark Lennihan

Representatives from 175 Countries Do the ‘Climate Hustle’ at UN

Earth Day’s news coverage of the “historic” ceremonial signing of the Paris Climate Agreement featured representatives from 175 countries walk up to the stage in the General Assembly hall at the United Nations headquarters in New York, sitting behind a desk on the podium, and adding their signatures to the book.

A member of the Presidential Security Group (PSG) walks under the solar panels at the roof deck of a mall in Manila on November 24, 2014. The 5,760 solar panels have been installed on the roof deck of the multi-level carpark of SM City mall.

Rooftop Solar Companies Only Play If Deck Stacked in Their Favor

Worried about self-preservation, and acting in its own best interest—rather than that of consumers specifically, and America in general—solar industry groups have sprung up to defend the favored-status energy policies and attack anyone who disagrees with the incentive-payment business model.

Hillary Clinton

The Dirty Story Behind Hillary Clinton’s ‘Clean Cookstoves’

On September 21, 2010, the Secretary of State announced the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves (Alliance) at the Annual Meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative (GCI)—with the Clinton Foundation being one of the “Strategic Partnerships and Alliances.” By November 2014, more than $400 million had been raised for the project.

Hillary Clinton

Hillary’s Freudian Slip

By now, most people know about Secretary Hillary Clinton’s recent campaign gaffe that “we’re going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business.”

Barack Obama

Obama’s Climate Change Legacy to Be Determined by Next President

President Obama’s controversial Clean Power Plan (CPP) was published in the Federal Register on October 23, 2015. But that is hardly the end of the story. Instead the saga is just beginning—with the ending to be written sometime in 2017 and the outcome highly dependent on who resides in the White House.

Joe Biden

Biden ‘Stimulus’ Anniversary Tour Avoids Obama’s Bankrupt Green Energy Project

In a week of big news stories, few noticed the seven-year anniversary of Obama’s $800 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act—signed into law on February 17, 2009. Despite the bill’s reputation, on Wednesday, Vice President Joe Biden embarked on a three-city victory tour to celebrate the anniversary of the act for which he oversaw the implementation.

AP

Campaign 2016: Nobody Cares about Climate Change (Except Tom Steyer)

Frustrated that nobody seems to care about climate change, “the country’s biggest individual political donor during the 2014 election cycle,” has pledged even more in 2016. Tom Steyer spent nearly $75 million in the 2014 midterms, reports Politico. He intends to “open his wallet even wider” now.

AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Ted and Trump Follow Different Paths on Ethanol

On Tuesday, January 19, at the Iowa Renewable Fuels Summit, Iowa’s long-time Governor Terry Branstad jumped into the campaign fray by attempting to influence the outcome of the February 1 caucus: “I don’t think that Ted Cruz is the right one for Iowans to support in the caucus.”

Elon Musk (Scott Olson / Getty)

SolarCity and the Silver Spoon

Having a successful business takes a lot of hard work, good market analysis, a better product or service than the competition, and advertising. Add in a bit of luck, and hopefully it will grow. If, however, you are a politically favored business—say solar—your story is different.

AP Photo

GOP Energy Report Card, 2015

Last year, when Republicans gained a decisive edge in both houses of Congress, I made predictions as to the six energy-policy changes we could expect—as the two parties have very different views on energy issues.