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Race-Hoax Backlash: Oscar Voter Slams ‘Selma’ Cast’s ‘I Can’t Breathe’ T-Shirts

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Over the last few months Breitbart News has analyzed the performance of director Ana DuVernay’s “Selma,” both at the box office and in the Awards Derby, through the lens of an America completely exhausted by nearly three years of unrelenting, left-wing/mainstream media race hoaxes. In an interview with the Hollywood Reporter Wednesday, a person described as a longtime female Academy voter blasted the film’s cast for “stirring up shit” by wearing “I Can’t Breathe” T-shirts:

I’ve got to tell you, having the cast show up in T-shirts saying “I can’t breathe” [at their New York premiere] — I thought that stuff was offensive. Did they want to be known for making the best movie of the year or for stirring up shit?

The t-shirt referred to by the Academy member is based on the latest race hoax perpetrated by the American left, the Obama White House, and their many allies in the mainstream media.

Late last year, just days after an elaborate media race hoax resulted in rioting and looting in Ferguson, Missouri, the New York City Police Department was accused of racism without a shred of proof.  While many, myself included, found the video of the arrest of 43 year-old Eric Garner disturbing (and excessive in relation to the “crime” of selling cigarettes out of a pack), nothing at the time or since has pointed to a racial motive in the arrest or the tragic death of  Mr. Garner while in custody.

While apparently being choked by the white arresting officer, Garner, a black man, could be heard saying, “I can’t breathe.” Those words quickly became the slogan of protests, many of which turned lawless, all of which fabricated a racial angle to the event without proof. Nevertheless, the cast of “Selma” chose to further inject a racial element by tying the “I Can’t Breathe” slogan to the New York premiere of their film.

To make matters worse, while wearing the T-shirts, the cast was also photographed in the “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” pose, which is based on the race-hoax used by the American media and its allies among looters and arsons to burn down large parts of the predominantly black, working class city of Ferguson.

The racially-dishonest “I Can’t Breathe” protests also came to a tragic close when a man, who claimed to be motivated by the protests, assassinated two New York City police officers before turning the gun on himself.

On top of “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” and “I Can’t Breathe” race hoaxes, Americans and Academy Voters have been exhausted by the year-long race hoax surrounding the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

Race hoaxes also touch “Selma” directly. The film itself falsely defames President Lyndon Johnson as an antagonist towards the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and  Martin Luther King’s historical Selma March. The truth is that he was a champion of both. Moreover, Oprah Winfrey, who stars in and produced “Selma,” race-hoaxed America little more than a year ago at the expense of a powerless Swiss store clerk.

The Academy voter also felt “Selma” fell short as art and she wasn’t at all swayed by the racial blackmail hurled by “Selma’s” supporters after it earned only two Oscar nominations (Best Song, a symbolic Best Picture nomination).

What no one wants to say out loud is that Selma is a well-crafted movie, but there’s no art to it. If the movie had been directed by a 60-year-old white male, I don’t think that people would have been carrying on about it to the level that they were. And as far as the accusations about the Academy being racist? Yes, most members are white males, but they are not the cast of Deliverance — they had to get into the Academy to begin with, so they’re not cretinous, snaggletoothed hillbillies. When a movie about black people is good, members vote for it. But if the movie isn’t that good, am I supposed to vote for it just because it has black people in it?

Follow John Nolte on Twitter @NolteNC               

 


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