George Soros Emerges as Major Funder of ‘Global Climate Strike’ Groups

Hungarian-born US investor and philanthropist George Soros talks to the audience after receiving the Schumpeter Award 2019 in Vienna, Austria on June 21, 2019. (Photo by GEORG HOCHMUTH / APA / AFP) / Austria OUT (Photo credit should read GEORG HOCHMUTH/AFP/Getty Images)
GEORG HOCHMUTH/AFP/Getty Images

George Soros financed radical environmental groups partnering in this week’s “Global Climate Strike” to the tune of nearly $25 million, according to a new report.

At least 22 of the left-wing activist groups listed as partners in the Global Climate Strike received $24,854,592 in funding from liberal billionaire George Soros between 2000-2017 through his Open Society Network, Joseph Vazquez reported Thursday for the Media Research Center.

Though ostensibly ignited by the protests of 16-year-old Greta Thunberg, the Global Climate Strike has borne from the outset the indelible fingerprints of well-funded, radical environmental activists. As it turns out, much of the funding has been coming from professional disrupter George Soros.

Among the organizations receiving Soros funding were Fund for Global Human Rights, Global Greengrants Fund, 350.org, Amnesty International, Avaaz, Color of Change, and People’s Action. Each of these groups has climate-related agendas and goals spanning from reducing global carbon emissions to less than 350 parts per million and 100 percent “clean energy,” to the elimination of new fossil fuel projects and a “green civil rights movement.”

Other major donors have included Democrat presidential candidate Tom Steyer’s NextGen America as well as the Sierra Club, which has reportedly received millions from former Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

The group 350.org, founded by Bill McKibben in 2008, has fought against coal power in India as well as tried to stop the Keystone XL pipeline in the U.S.

While kids were marching, singing, and twerking for the Global Climate Strike, a group of more than 500 scientists and professionals appealed to the United Nations for a long overdue, open debate on climate change.

“Climate science should be less political, while climate policies should be more scientific,” the scientists stated in their declaration sent to the U.N. secretary general.

“Scientists should openly address the uncertainties and exaggerations in their predictions of global warming, while politicians should dispassionately count the real benefits as well as the imagined costs of adaptation to global warming, and the real costs as well as the imagined benefits of mitigation,” they said.

The signers also insisted that public policy must respect scientific and economic realities and not just reflect the most fashionable trend of the day.

“There is no climate emergency. Therefore, there is no cause for panic and alarm,” they noted. “We strongly oppose the harmful and unrealistic net-zero CO2 policy proposed for 2050.”

“If better approaches emerge, and they certainly will, we have ample time to reflect and adapt. The aim of international policy should be to provide reliable and affordable energy at all times, and throughout the world,” they said.

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