Far-Left PKK Supporters Accused of Attacking Turkish Association in France

** FILE ** In this Nov. 12, 2007 file picture, Kurdish demonstrators are silhouetted by a Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) flag during a protest in the Cypriot capital of Nicosia. Kurdish rebels have kidnapped three German climbers on Mount Ararat, the governor of a province in eastern Turkey said Wednesday …
AP Photo/Petros Karadjias

Supporters of the far-left terrorist Kurdistan Worker’s Party (PKK) have attacked several Turkish associations across France this week, according to claims from Turkish media.

The latest attack is said to have taken place in the commune of Marignane, in the Aix-Marseille-Provence Metropolis in southern France, and saw a group of 40 masked individuals smash the windows of a Turkish association while allegedly chanting pro-PKK slogans.

According to a report from the Turkish newspaper Sabah, the attack was the fourth on a Turkish association in the last week, claiming that similar incidents had also taken place in Strasbourg and Paris and that Turkish restaurants were targeted in Lyon.

Abdullah Eren, the president of the Turks Abroad and Related Communities, a government office based in Ankara, Turkey, said of the incident: “This is the fourth attack in which they targeted the Turkish community in a week in France! We call on France to do what is necessary with these terrorists, who are also a threat to public security.”

As well as being designated a terrorist organisation in Turkey, the PKK is also prescribed in the United Kingdom, European Union, and the United States.

Eren also posted a video showing a group of masked individuals smashing windows.

These are just the latest clashes between Kurdish extremists and Turks in European countries in recent years.

Last year in the Austrian capital of Vienna, member of the PKK, along with their Antifa allies, fought with the far-right ultranationalist Turkish Grey Wolves, with Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz accusing Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of stoking tensions in his country.

Turks and Kurds have also seen years of conflict in some areas of Germany, such as in 2016 when the ethnic groups clashed on the streets of Duisburg.

The PKK’s Antifa allies have also been accused of attacking Turkish associations and mosques in the past. In 2018, Antifa militants claimed responsibility for an attack on a Turkish mosque in Kassel, Germany.

Last month, Turkish media accused PKK supporters of vandalising a mosque in Kassel, spray painting insulting slogans on the side of the building.

Follow Chris Tomlinson on Twitter at @TomlinsonCJ or email at ctomlinson(at)breitbart.com

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