U.S. Military Ammo Supply Line Is Not China-Dependent

Ammunition boxes are for sale at a gun shop in Merrimack, New Hampshire, on November 5, 2016. According to the proprietor, October's sales in his store were double that of 2015, with customers expressing anxiety about the November election. / AFP / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP …
DOMINICK REUTER/AFP via Getty

As possible geopolitical and national security ramifications of limiting ties with China post-coronavirus are weighed, it is important to point out that the U.S. military ammunition supply is not China-dependent.

On March 20, 2020, the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) sent a letter to the Department of Defense in which the critical role of domestic firearm and ammunition manufacturers was emphasized.

The NSSF said:

The United States military acquires virtually all its small arms from domestic commercial firearm manufacturers. All handgun ammunition used by the U.S. military is sourced from commercial ammunition manufacturers. The Department of Defense arsenal located in Lake City, Missouri, is operated by a commercial ammunition manufacturer under a DOD contact. Most of the rifle ammunition used by the U.S. military is produced in Lake City. The U.S. military also purchases rifle ammunition directly from domestic commercial ammunition manufacturers. The federal government recognizes the importance of ammunition and firearm manufacturing in times of crisis.

NSSF public affairs director, Mark Olivia, spoke with Breitbart News about American companies building ammunition for America’s military.

Olivia said:

The National Shooting Sports Foundation is proud that virtually all small arms and ammunition used by the U.S. military is produced by domestic manufacturing. This shows the importance of a robust firearm and ammunition industry and why the firearm industry fought to have these manufacturers listed as critical essential infrastructure by the Department of Homeland Security. Our nation can be reassured knowing that in times of crisis, and in concerns of national security, the U.S. military is equipped with the best possible tools for mission success. That comes from U.S. manufacturing.

On January 15, 2020, UPI reported that Sig Sauer secured a contract to provide sniper ammunition for the U.S. Army. Sig Sauer ammunition is made in Arkansas.

And in addition to making ammunition for military, Sig Sauer also makes guns that enjoy wide ranging service among our troops.

Tom Taylor, executive vice president, commercial sales, Sig Sauer, told Breitbart News:

We are very proud to be a major part of the U.S. defense manufacturing base with M17 and M18 handguns, made in New Hampshire and now in service with all branches of the US military.  We are also honored to be part of that defense supply with our new machine gun, hybrid ammunition and suppressor technology, which is currently in down selection for the U.S. Army’s Next Generation Weapon System, along with our long range sniper ammunition made in our factory in Arkansas.

Winchester, a company forever part of America’s firearm heritage due to its lever action rifle, also makes ammunition. PR Newswire reports that Winchester secured a contract in late 2019 that will have them making ammunition for the U.S. Army for at least the next seven years.

Defense News reports that South Dakota’s Black Hills Ammunition is contracted on a multi-million dollar basis to provide .556 ammunition for many of the the U.S. Navy Sea Systems Command.

The list goes on, and the point is clear: The U.S. military ammunition supply chain is not China-dependent.

AWR Hawkins is an award-winning Second Amendment columnist for Breitbart News and the writer/curator of Down Range with AWR Hawkins, a weekly newsletter focused on all things Second Amendment, also for Breitbart News. He is the political analyst for Armed American Radio. Follow him on Twitter: @AWRHawkins. Reach him directly at awrhawkins@breitbart.com. Sign up to get Down Range at breitbart.com/downrange.

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