Constitution

Supreme Court Takes on Race, Death Penalty, Rejects Gitmo Case

The Supreme Court added five new cases to its term for fall 2019, including racial discrimination, the environment, the death penalty, and international child abduction. On the same day, the Court refused to dive into declaring new legal rights for Islamic terrorists held by the U.S. military.

The Associated Press

Supreme Court Tees up Redistricting Cases in Swing States

The Supreme Court weighed in on redistricting fights in crucial 2020 presidential swing states, blocking four lower-court decisions on Friday, as the justices prepare to decide how much unelected judges can weigh in on politicians’ drawing legislative district lines.

A December 10, 2018 photo shows the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC. - The US Supreme Court declined to hear appeal cases by Kansas and Louisiana to end public funding through Medicaid to Planned Parenthood. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Duterte Poised to Improve His Position in Midterm Elections as Popularity Soars

Rodrigo Duterte, the perpetually controversial president of the Philippines, appears on track to increase his legislative influence in the midterm elections. Duterte’s critics hoped the election would be a negative referendum on his administration halfway through his six-year term, but his approval ratings are approaching all-time highs and candidates aligned with him are doing well in the polls.

The Associated Press

White House to William Barr: Prepare for War over Mueller Report

White House Special Counsel Emmet Flood sent a letter to Attorney General William Barr making clear that President Donald Trump is retaining his legal privileges as partisan Democrats escalate their conflict against the president over the Mueller Report.

Emmet Flood

Milestone: Senate Confirms 100 Trump Judges, More to Come

Senators on Thursday confirmed the 100th judge nominated by President Donald Trump, marking a major milestone in the president’s pledge to replenish the federal courts with judges like the late originalist icon Antonin Scalia.

(Photo: Pablo Martinez Monsivais, AP)

Supreme Court Likely to Approve Citizenship Question on 2020 Census

The Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday on whether the 2020 census can ask every person in this country whether they are an American citizen, a question with implications for legislative redistricting, voting rights, and presidential politics.

The Associated Press

Blue State Blues: Passover and the American Tradition of Freedom

The immediate and urgent cultural task for American conservatives is to find a way of sharing our cherished values of freedom with the next generation — and with those who are arriving, legally, to join us. Passover, observed even in the worst of times, teaches us that it is possible.

Passover seder (Joe Raedle / Getty)

Klukowski: Jerrold Nadler Rejects Constitution’s Limitations on Impeaching Trump

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler said Congress can impeach PresidentTrump for matters that are not crimes, and also for alleged acts that he claims Trump committed before becoming president, rejecting key limits that the Framers of the Constitution placed on Congress’s impeachment power.

Donald Trump, Jerrold Nadler

Justice Clarence Thomas Takes Constitutional Stand in Indiana SUV Seizure Case

The Supreme Court unanimously ruled on Wednesday that the Constitution’s protection against excessive fines blocked Indiana from seizing a high-end vehicle, but Justice Clarence Thomas would have reached the same result by another route, with Justice Neil Gorsuch signaling support for Thomas’s originalist argument.  

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Clarence Thomas

Supreme Court to Decide if Census Can Check U.S. Citizenship

The Supreme Court will decide whether the 2020 census can ask every person in America if they are a U.S. citizen, granting review Friday on a legal challenge to that question and bypassing the federal appeals court in an extremely rare move not seen in many years.

supreme court, Citizenship Question

Klukowski: President Trump Must Ensure Spending Bill Does Not Cancel Emergency Powers

The White House should be extremely cautious in studying every single word in Congress’s spending bill, because even a single phrase could negate every authority President Donald Trump currently has under federal law to build and fund the border wall, even canceling his authority to declare a national border emergency.

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 20: President Donald Trump formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, in the PresidentÕs Room of the Senate, at the Capitol in Washington, January 20, 2017. (Photo by J. Scott Applewhite - Pool/Getty Images)