Evangelical Group Misleads on Funding Source for Immigration Ads

More:

Immigration Bill

In a story Thursday at The Christian Post, the Evangelical Immigration Table denied that left-wing billionaire George Soros provided funding for the EIT's recent advertising in support of the Senate's immigration reform. The article specifically pushes back on reporting done by myself and my colleague Matthew Boyle. Unfortunately, EIT's denials fail to address the crux of our reporting. 

Breitbart News has reported that the Evangelical Immigration Table, whose members have taken a leading role in pushing for the Schumer-Rubio immigration bill, doesn't legally exist. We have also reported that the ads the group claims are "paid for by the Evangelical Immigration Table" were actually purchased by the National Immigration Forum, an organization which has received millions of dollars from George Soros' Open Society Institute. 

This may not be surprising, since it is hard for an entity that doesn't legally exist to purchase anything, never mind advertising. 

Did George Soros specifically earmark part of his donation to fund the EIT's ad campaign? I don't know. Breitbart News never claimed it did, only pointing out the fact that EIT was not being transparent about the funding source of its ads. On Thursday, the National Immigration Forum issued a carefully parsed press release on the controversy:

None of the funding the Forum receives from the Open Society Foundation goes to the work of the Evangelical Immigration Table. In fact, over the course of 2012 and 2013, approximately 10 percent of the Forum’s overall revenue has been from the Open Society Foundation. 

I will take them at their word. Money, however, is fungible. A single entity providing 10% of an organization's budget is actually fairly considerable. So, if no Soros money was used to pay for the ads, why the need to mislead on the fact that the National Immigration Forum purchased the ads?

The Evangelical Immigration Table, which, again, doesn't actually legally exist, claims the money for their ads came from gay-marriage activist Paul Singer, the US Chamber of Commerce, Walmart and several "Christian business owners."

Of course, until EIT chooses to come out of the shadows and become a legal entity, it will be impossible to know the full truth.  


 

advertisement

Breitbart Video Picks

advertisement

advertisement

Fox News National

advertisement

advertisement

Send A Tip

From Our Partners