Sessions: Gang of Eight Bill Hurts Hispanic Working Class, Could Be 'in Trouble'

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Immigration Bill

Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) said the Senate's immigration bill would hurt the Hispanic working class and "could be in trouble again" if more people find out about the ineffectiveness of the "border surge" amendment introduced by Sens. Bob Corker (R-TN) and John Hoeven (R-ND).

Appearing on CBS's Face the Nation on Sunday, Sessions said the Gang of Eight's bill "grants amnesty first, and a mere promise of enforcement in the future, even with the Corker-Hoeven amendment," which he said was only added because the bill was "in trouble." 

"They said it had 70 votes last week and then, all of a sudden, it started sinking when people learned more about it," Sessions said. "I think if people found out this amendment does not accomplish what the sponsors believe it does, I think the bill could be back in trouble again."

Sessions also said Senators will vote on a 1,200-page bill "nobody has read" and noted there is even a specific provision in the bill that enables Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano, who has already said publicly there is "enough fencing," to decide against adding more fencing along the border. 

"This amendment does not fulfill its promises either," Sessions said, concluding that if the bill passes, there will be "no enforcement in the future" and "continued illegality."

As a result, Sessions said the labor force will be flooded and the bill will ultimately hurt working class Hispanics who are trying to get into the middle class, noting the millions of Hispanics who currently have jobs that pay between $20,000 to $40,000.

"Somebody needs to speak up for them," Sessions said, noting the bill would impact all working Americans adversely and politicians needed to move "away from ethnic politics" and appeal to "all people based on what's best for America."

He said the bill would make it more difficult for working class Hispanics--and all working class Americans--to get decent jobs with retirement and healthcare benefits because it will grant amnesty first, allow for more illegality, and lower wages.

"Why would any Member of Congress want to vote for a bill at a time of high unemployment, falling wages?" Sessions asked.

He cited studies by the Federal Reserve in Atlanta, Harvard economists and the Congressional Budget Office that concluded the Senate's bill would adversely impact America's working class, noting there will be a "huge surge of labor" that will hurt "the poorest among us the most."

"There's really little doubt about that," Sessions said. 


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