EXCLUSIVE: West Texas Border Sector Now Epicenter of Migrant Crisis

Large Group DRT
CBP

DEL RIO, Texas — A source within U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) explains the Del Rio Sector is holding the lead in migrant apprehensions throughout the southwest. In January thus far, there are nearly 16,000 apprehensions, averaging almost 1,000 daily.

Established CBP statistics show lead changes are not common. The Rio Grande Valley Sector held the top position in migrant apprehensions since 2013. Large migrant groups crossing through the Del Rio Sector, particularly in Eagle Pass, are now the norm.

Five such large groups were apprehended within the sector over the last four days. In one instance, according to the Border Patrol, one group near Eagle Pass numbered more than 265.

The lead change may have more to do with a a reduction of migrant crossings in the Rio Grande Valley Sector, rather than an increase in in Del Rio. In November 2021, the RGV apprehended an average of 1,590 migrants per day. That daily average dropped to 700 in January.

The source believes recent international law enforcement efforts may have contributed to a reduction in the Rio Grande Valley. In a recent report by Breitbart Texas, 359 migrants were arrested in Mexico.

In another instance, 120 kidnapped migrants were rescued by law enforcement officials from a cartel safe-house in Ciudad Victoria. The source says although the efforts of foreign entities may be benefiting south Texas, the effects are not felt further west along the border.

The migrant crossings in Del Rio have resulted in facility overcrowding and a reduction in routine patrols. The source says the Del Rio Sector is overwhelmed by the level of crossings and is averaging more than 800 apprehensions per day since the start of January.

Since the fiscal year started in October 2021, the source says some 271,000 migrants have been apprehended along the southwest border — eclipsing the 30,000 apprehended during the same time frame last year.

The relative reductions seen in the Rio Grande Valley are dependent on Mexico’s enforcement actions. The U.S. source says Mexico’s resources are stretched as thin and any curtailed efforts will immediately be felt in south Texas.

Randy Clark is a 32-year veteran of the United States Border Patrol.  Prior to his retirement, he served as the Division Chief for Law Enforcement Operations, directing operations for nine Border Patrol Stations within the Del Rio, Texas, Sector. Follow him on Twitter @RandyClarkBBTX.

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