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Broadway Star Carole Cook Jokes About Trump Assassination: ‘Where’s John Wilkes Booth When you Need Him?’

Carole Cook is seen at the "Lucille Ball At 100 & 'I Love Lucy' At 60" opening gala at The Hollywood Museum in Los Angeles, on Thursday, Aug. 4, 2011. The event also celebrates the recently released "Best of I love Lucy" DVD collection from CBS Home Entertainment and Paramount …
Casey Rodgers/AP Images for CBS DVD

Asked Sunday evening for her thoughts on Frozen the Broadway Musical actor Timothy Hughes snatching a pro-Trump flag from an audience member last week, legendary Broadway actress Carole Cook cracked a joke about the need for President Donald Trump to be assassinated.

Leaving West Hollywood eatery Craig’s with her husband in tow, TMZ asked Cook, “What did you think about this story that someone brought a Trump banner to the Frozen on Broadway?

“I didn’t see that,” the 94-actress replied.

TMZ followed up by asking if a Broadway musical is an appropriate venue to express pro-Trump sentiments.

“My answer to that is, where’s John Wilkes Booth when you need him?” Cook replied, prompting laughter from the trio.

“Now you’re going to ask me who the hell John Wilkes Booth is,” the Broadway actress added.

“He killed presidents,” Cook’s husband said of President Abraham Lincoln’s killer.

Cook, realizing that her joke was uttered in poor taste, ordered her husband not mention Booth assassinated a president.

“They’ll get me for that,” she muttered sarcastically.

Seconds later, Cook’s concerns about her joke about President Trump being assassinated dissipates, asking TMZ once more, “Where is [Booth] when you need him?”

The footage then pivots to Cook once again raising concerns that her remarks will draw ire. “Will that get me in trouble?” she asked TMZ. “Will I be on an enemies list?”

“My God, I hope so,” she added.

The comment makes Cook the latest entertainment figure to joke about the death of President Trump.

Last year, actor Johnny Depp asked a crowd at the Glastonbury Festival in England, “When was the last time an actor assassinated a president?”

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