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Klobuchar Pitches Herself as Heartland States Democrat: ‘Look at What I’ve Done’

U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., speaks to voters, Sunday, Feb. 24, 2019, during a campaign stop at a home, in Nashua, N.H. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
AP Photo/Steven Senne
KYLE MORRIS

Monday in New Hampshire at a CNN town hall, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) once again insisted that as a 2020 presidential candidate she possesses the ability to win over America’s Heartland, which largely supported Donald Trump in the 2016 election.

When responding to how she would gain the support of the “discontent middle class in the heartland,” Klobuchar stated:

I guess you look at what I’ve done, and that is I am someone that runs in a purple state. It is a state when I first started running for office the other senator was Republican, the governor was Republican, and three our four of constitutional officers was Republican. And I started running. And every single time I have won, I have won every single congressional district in my state, including Michele Bachmann’s, okay?

Klobuchar’s Monday evening comments on how to appeal to the heartland states are similar to comments she has made in the past.

“People are so mad about Donald Trump and the Republicans,” the Midwestern senator stated during a recent Des Moines interview. “But remember, this is about actually getting things done. And first of all, winning an election. There’s nothing wrong with anger and passion, but it’s putting it into something that will get results.”

“I am your neighbor,” Klobuchar recently told voters in Des Moines. “I think you all know we had some difficulty in some of the states in the heartland in 2016. But I’m someone who’s been able to win in difficult counties.”

According to the US Census Bureau, North Dakota, South Dakota, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana, and Ohio are typically associated with the “Small Heartland.”

Judged by what the US Census Bureau considers “Small Heartland” states, Trump won ten of those twelve states, with Illinois and Minnesota being the only two states that supported Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in 2016.

Hillary Clinton won over Klobuchar’s home state of Minnesota by a slim margin in 2016 with only 44,593 more votes than Trump. Clinton finished with 1,367,825 votes, or 46.4 percent, as opposed to Trump who finished with 1,323,232 votes, or 44.9 percent.

President Trump hopes to retain support in the Heartland and has already set his sights on Minnesota, a state he wants to win in 2020.

While at a Duluth, Minnesota rally last June, President Trump said, “I hate to bring this up, but we came this close to winning the state of Minnesota.”

Since she first announced her bid for the presidency, Klobuchar has been skeptical of the far-fetched and mainstream ideas her prominent Democratic colleagues are clinching tightly to, such as “Medicare for All” and the Green New Deal.

Follow Kyle on Twitter @RealKyleMorris and Facebook.

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