Poll: 0% of Black Voters Say They Had a Poor Experience Voting in Georgia

Democratic Senate candidate Reverend Raphael Warnock attends a rally on October 24, 2020, in Duluth, Georgia. - Neighbors and volunteers are handing out water and snacks to the masked voters waiting patiently in line to cast their ballots on a hot October day in the Atlanta suburb of Smyrna. Americans …
ELIJAH NOUVELAGE/AFP via Getty Images

No black voters had a poor experience voting in the 2022 midterm elections in Georgia, according to a poll conducted by the University of Georgia.

The poll, published Monday by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, found that among black voters, 73 percent said they had an “excellent” overall experience voting, 23 percent said they had a “good” experience, three percent said they had a “fair” experience, and zero percent said they had a “poor” experience.

The 73 percent of black voters who said they had an “excellent” experience is equal to the percentage of white voters, also 73 percent, who said they had an “excellent” experience voting.

Among all of the poll’s 1,253 respondents, more than 95 percent said they had an “excellent” or “good” overall experience voting, while four percent said their experience was “fair” and less than one percent said their experience was “poor.”

A voter exits a polling location in Columbus, Georgia, US, on Sunday, Nov. 27, 2022. Democratic US Senator Raphael Warnock led Walker by about 36,000 votes or 0.9 percent in the general election, but neither candidate broke the 50% threshold needed to avoid the Dec. 6 runoff. Photographer: Cheney Orr/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A voter exits a polling location in Columbus, Georgia, November 27, 2022. (Cheney Orr/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

That Georgians had an overwhelmingly smooth time with casting their ballots comes after repeated fear-mongering from top Democrats, including newly reelected Sen. Raphael Warnock (D-GA), President Joe Biden, and two-time losing gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, that the state’s Election Integrity Act of 2021 would suppress votes of racial minorities.

During the U.S. Senate debate in October, Warnock painted a picture of voters having to fight an arduous uphill battle to get to the polls because of the bill after he was asked by the debate moderator why — if voter suppression existed — did Georgia see record turnout and an increase in black voters in the state’s primary that year.

Warnock said:

The fact that many of our voters are overcoming this hardship doesn’t undermine that reality. They’ve made it harder for folks to use the drop boxes. They’ve shortened the registration times. Folks are saying, you know, “You shouldn’t have to— you should be able to get food or water in a line.” I think the question is more fundamental than that. Why are the lines so long in certain communities, and not others?

Warnock, Abrams, Biden, and other Democrats decried the voting overhaul bill as “Jim Crow 2.0” or “Jim Crow in the 21st century.”

Major League Baseball (MLB) famously pulled its All-Star Game out of Georgia in 2021 in protest of the election law, depriving the state of valuable revenue.

The poll is the latest indicator, following record-breaking turnout numbers and few to no local reports of hardship about voting during the past year, that the claims made by Democrats and their corporate allies, like the MLB and Coca-Cola, were false.

More than 90 percent of the poll’s respondents said casting a ballot was easy in the 2022 midterm elections.

A majority of respondents, 75 percent, said they waited less than ten minutes in line to cast their ballot, while 21 percent said they waited from ten to 30 minutes to cast theirs. Four percent said they waited 31 minutes to an hour, and one percent said they waited more than an hour.

“Yet again, the myth of voter suppression in Georgia fails to be supported by a shred of evidence,” Gov. Brian Kemp (R) said in a statement about the poll results. “Democrats have juiced this lie for every cent it was worth, disparaging our state and undermining faith in our elections. But the facts are clear: Georgia’s Election Integrity Act made it easy to vote and hard to cheat.”

The poll was conducted from November 13 through the day of the runoff election, December 6, and had a margin of error of +/- 2.8 percentage points.

Write to Ashley Oliver at aoliver@breitbart.com. Follow her on Twitter at @asholiver.

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