Tory Brexiteer: Europe Wants Delay So They Can Take Our Money For Another Two Years

GATESHEAD, ENGLAND - JUNE 20: Conservative MP David Davis attends the final 'We Want Our Country Back' public meeting of the EU Referendum campaign on June 20, 2016 in Gateshead, England. Campaigning continues across the UK as the country goes to the polls on Thursday, to decide whether Britain should …
Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Former Brexit secretary David Davis said that the European Union is trying to push for an extension to the transition period in an attempt to siphon off more British money during the impending economic collapse the bloc is facing as a result of the Chinese coronavirus.

In response to the two-year extension floated by the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, Conservative MP and former special forces reservist David Davis said that the UK could not afford to cower and extend the transition period, as “every single time we extend, we weaken our position and strengthen theirs”.

Mr Davis said that throughout trade negotiations with the bloc, the economy of the UK  has remained stable, which he believes is a signal of how well prepared the country is to leave the EU. “For the economy to just charge on through: that is amazing,” Davis said in an interview with LBC Radio on Monday.

The Brexiteer MP said that in comparison, the EU’s financial status is “very poor” due to the Chinese coronavirus that resulted in lockdowns across the continent, which is why — in his view– the bloc is pushing for the UK to remain in the European Union to help subsidise the economic recovery with money from the British taxpayer.

“They want our money for another two years,” he cautioned.

Davis said that “Boris has to talk to the heads of the government” and tell them that the United Kindom wants “a deal, but we want a deal which is fair to both of us. So let’s sign on something which does that, not keep putting it off forever.”

The Member of Parliament for Haltemprice and Howden and former Brexit secretary said that the only time since the referendum that the British economy faltered was when “Theresa May extended from March 29th, then suddenly everything fell out of bed” as it forced businesses to scrap their preparations for leaving the bloc on that date.

In 2018, Davis resigned from Theresa May’s Remainer-dominated government after she unveiled her plan for a soft Brexit. He said at the time that it “hands control of large swathes of our economy to the EU” which “is certainly not returning control of our laws in any real sense”.

There have been increased calls from left-wing politicians in the country to extend the Brexit transition period, with the common refrain being that the UK should not risk any potential economic damage during the coronavirus crisis.

On May 28th, the leader of the Liberal Democrats, Sir Edward ‘Ed’ Davey, called on the government to extend the UK’s full departure from the bloc by two years, arguing that it is “just common sense” in light of coronavirus.

“We are facing the deepest recession in 300 years [a]fter the most serious public health crisis in over 100 years,” he argued in a statement posted on social media.

The leftist mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, echoed the calls for an extension, saying that: “The last thing the country needs as it tries to find a way back from the devastation wreaked by coronavirus is more chaos and uncertainty.”

An extension to the transition period would effectively lock the United Kingdom into a scenario in which the country would be bound by EU laws and regulations while having zero democratic say in the lawmaking process.

Following the formal departure from the bloc on January 31st, 2020, the UK gave up its seats in the European Parliament, despite the fact that it remains under EU control while negotiations continue.

Follow Kurt on Twitter at @KurtZindulka

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