Migrants Complain Taxpayer-Funded Housing Is Like ‘Prison’

DOVER, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 10: The UK Border Force disembark migrants at Dover Marina after being intercepted in the English Channel on September 10, 2020 in Dover, England. More than 1,468 migrants, some of them children, crossed the English Channel by small boat in August, despite a commitment from British …
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Migrants who came to Britain seeking asylum have complained that their tax-payer funded open accommodation at a former military base is like a “prison”.

Following a massive increase in the number of illegals crossing the English Channel by boat, authorities were forced to turn two disused military bases that had housed British soldiers into camps for migrants, with one opening in Folkestone, England, and another in Wales.

The latter facility is just outside the small Welsh village of Penally and houses some 250 migrants. Locals raised concern when it was reported that all of those residing on their doorstep would be young men.

Local newspaper the Western Telegraph reported on Wednesday that the migrants were protesting outside of the former Ministry of Defence (MoD) accommodation, claiming that the buildings they were staying in were old, the toilets were too far away, they had no privacy, and they had to wait too long in line to be fed.

The asylum seekers, almost all of whom will have passed through France and other safe countries en route to Britain, claim to be fleeing “war”.

They described the accommodation as “not intended for asylum seekers and refugees” and that their “large number” was preventing social distancing — something migrants seem unconcerned by when illegally crossing the Channel on crowded boats.

“Facilities like showers and toilets are far away, and we need to walk long distances in the rain and stormy weather to reach them. We wait for a long time in line to get meals in the rain, and there is a lack of access to health care. The problem was exacerbated by the recent lockdown.

“We demand that we be moved to housing. Refugees should not be placed in old military camps,” the migrants complained.

Some protesting outside the facility were seen holding pieces of cardboard reading: “We escaped from war to prison”, “the refgee [sic] has right to stay in a home”, and “where are the human rights!”

While the men may leave the facility between 10 a.m. and 10 p.m., Stand Up to Racism West Wales claimed that the barracks were “effectively being used as a detention centre or, as the men call it, a prison”.

The leftist open borders activists have protested before that migrants living in the Welsh base were deserving of a more luxurious living standard, having claimed in September that their living arrangements were “degrading” — despite the conditions being hitherto suitable for serving soldiers, who did not have the right to complain about having to share rooms, waiting to eat, or walking to the head in the rain, and had to perform work duties on top of it.

It is not the first time that migrants have complained about the care provided on behalf of the British taxpayer. After Sudanese migrant Badreddin Abadlla Adam went on a stabbing spree in the Glasgow hotel where he was being housed, fellow migrants and the media were keen to portray the attack as the actions of a “desperate” man unhappy with his living conditions.

Sky News in Scotland had reported in June testimony from another asylum seeker staying at the Park Inn Hotel that Abadlla Adam was unhappy with the “limited WiFi”, free food that was “very poor”, and the fact he was not receiving any money on top of his all-expenses-paid accommodation.

A Kurdish community activist said that other alleged refugees fleeing war were unhappy that the hotel served food that “wasn’t culturally appropriate”.

“People were complaining at getting the same spaghetti and macaroni cheese all the time,” the activist said.

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