6 International Bad Guys Thrilled to Have Biden in Office This Year

A woman walks down from the stage inside an auditorium at Kabul University's education center during a demonstration in support of the Taliban government in Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday, Sept. 11, 2021. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
AP Photo/Felipe Dana

President Joe Biden is nearing the end of his first year in office – a meaningful milestone after a year of global chaos spurred on by incoherent and sometimes seemingly deliberately counterproductive policies.

As a candidate, Biden promised voters, “America’s coming back like we used to be: ethical, straight, tell ’em the truth … supporting our allies, all those good things.” For much of the year, America’s allies have loudly complained they feel anything but supported – Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky described himself more as “very unpleasantly surprised.”

But not all international actors have reason to dismay over Biden’s policies. Terrorists, guerrillas, and assorted state-actor rogues all have had reason to cheer this year. Below, six of the worst global offenders better off today thanks to Biden.

Ansarallah (the Yemeni Houthi movement)

Fighters loyal to Yemen's Huthi rebels pump their fists during a ceremony on the eve of celebrations marking the birth of Islam's Prophet Mohammed, in the Yemeni capital Sanaa on October 18, 2021. (Photo by Mohammed HUWAIS / AFP) (Photo by MOHAMMED HUWAIS/AFP via Getty Images)

Fighters loyal to Yemen’s Huthi rebels pump their fists during a ceremony on the eve of celebrations marking the birth of Islam’s Mohammed, in the Yemeni capital Sanaa on October 18, 2021. (MOHAMMED HUWAIS/AFP via Getty Images)

The Houthis are a Shiite jihadist terrorist organization that triggered a civil war in Yemen by overthrowing legitimate President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi in 2015. The group is closely allied to Iran, the world’s stop state sponsor of terrorism, and its motto is “Allahu Akbar, Death to America, Death to Israel, a Curse on the Jews, Victory to Islam.” Thanks to its violent overthrow of the government and subsequent persecution of Yemeni citizens, Yemen is arguably the world’s worst humanitarian disaster today, a place where mass deaths due to malnutrition, famine, and preventable disease are common.

As one of his first moves in office, Biden delisted the Houthis as a Foreign Terrorist Organization, reportedly a friendly gesture meant to convince the group to stop blocking humanitarian aid into Yemen and starving its own people. Secretary of State Antony Blinken clarified in his statement on the matter that the Biden administration does not actually think the Houthis are not terrorists, but lying about it, the administration hopes, could result in “dialogue.”

“The revocations are intended to ensure that relevant U.S. policies do not impede assistance to those already suffering what has been called the world’s worst humanitarian crisis,” Blinken wrote.

The revocation of the designation, which allows greater unimpeded funding for the terrorists, resulted in near-immediate blocking of humanitarian aid to Yemeni citizens trapped in Houthi territory.

“Ongoing interference in international aid operations by the Houthis in Yemen has prevented millions of people from receiving the assistance they need to survive,” the State Department admitted to Breitbart News less than a month after the designation was revoked.

The little aid that gets through, the Associated Press reported at the time, the Houthis get paid to allow.

The delisting preceded not just a financial windfall for the Houthis but a whirlwind of more terrorist activity, including missile attacks on schools and a mass kidnapping of workers at the former U.S. embassy in Sana’a, the nation’s capital. The U.S. Center for Strategic and International Studies documented a doubling of Houthi attacks on neighboring Saudi Arabia in the past year.

The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC)

A man and children stand next to a graffitis of late FARC commander Alfonso Cano (C) at El Oso Territorial Training and Reincorporation Area (ETCR), in Gaitania, Tolima Department, Colombia, on October 27, 2021. - It all began in a hovel perched on a mountainside in the Colombian Andes, where peasant soldiers, beseiged by government forces, founded in the spring of 1964 the Revolutionary Arned Forces of Colombia. After 50 years of armed struggle, and another five since the historic 2016 peace accords that ended FARC's battle against the state, this isolated southcentral region has rediscovered peace. (Photo by Raul ARBOLEDA / AFP) (Photo by RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP via Getty Images)

A man and children stand next to a graffitis of late FARC commander Alfonso Cano (C) at El Oso Territorial Training and Reincorporation Area (ETCR), in Gaitania, Tolima Department, Colombia, on October 27, 2021. (RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP via Getty Images)

In a similar move, the Biden administration delisted the FARC – a narco-communist terrorist organization responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths, kidnappings, rapes, forced abortions, incidences of child soldier use, and other human rights atrocities – as a foreign terrorist organization in November. Unlike the Houthis, the FARC has embarked on a years-long process of legitimization that included the signing of a “peace deal” with the Colombian government. The deal, which won then-President Juan Manuel Santos the Nobel Peace Prize in 2016, allows the FARC to operate as a political party and fund itself with its dubious drug trafficking proceeds with little oversight. It also grants the terrorist organization uncontested seats in the Colombian Congress.

The “peace deal” has done little to reduce FARC violence in the country and preceded a record cocaine cultivation boom. The organization has thrived, however, by superficially dividing itself into political figures – the FARC proper – and guerrilla terrorists, which it has branded FARC “dissidents.” No evidence suggests that these two groups do not share common aspirations, but the Biden administration nonetheless delisted the FARC proper and rebranded the “dissidents” with the name “Second Marquetalía,” which is actually what the FARC calls its current war on the Colombian government.

Colombian President Iván Duque responded to Biden’s move with surprise and disgust.

“We would have preferred another decision,” lamented President Iván Duque, expressing surprise and confirming Washington kept him out of the loop of that decision.

“The military estimates that there are currently more than 2,700+ armed militants, 1,700+ residual forces, and another 1,000 or so in Venezuela,” Joseph Humire, the executive director of the Center for a Secure Free Society, told Breitbart News this month. “If you add this up, this means that the FARC-D [dissidents] has about 5,400 dissident fighters and is rebuilding its armed militant structure in Colombia and Venezuela … The Biden admin FARC delisting will help them fill the ranks.”

Nigeria’s Fulani Herdsmen/Boko Haram

Fulani muslim men pray in Masallacin Shehu Mosque, Sokoto, Sokoto State, Nigeria, on April 24, 2019. - Although it has lost its former political power, the Sokoto Sultanate Council continues to exist and the Sokoto Sultan -traditionally belonging to the Fulani People- is still a leading figure in Nigerian society. Due to its impact, the Sokoto Caliphate is also revered by Islamists in modern Nigeria. Usman Dan Fodio was a prominent Fulani religious leader, Islamic promoter and the founder of the Sokoto Caliphate. The ongoing strife between Muslim herders and Christian farmers, sometimes hiding conflict due to religious differences, is a divisive issue for Nigeria and some other countries in West Africa. (Photo by Luis TATO / AFP) (Photo credit should read LUIS TATO/AFP via Getty Images)

Fulani Muslim men pray in Masallacin Shehu Mosque, Sokoto, Sokoto State, Nigeria, on April 24, 2019. (LUIS TATO/AFP via Getty Images)

The Biden administration inexplicably removed Nigeria from a State Department list of “Countries of Particular Concern” over religious freedom, a move that the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF), a separate government entity, said it was “appalled” by. The move occurred alongside Blinken announcing significant investments in the Nigerian government, an apparent move to compete with China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), which offers poor countries extravagant loans with high interest rates meant for infrastructure projects that later trap the country under Beijing’s influence.

Delisting Nigeria, to many religious freedom advocates, equated to ignoring the plight of Christians in the north of the country who face extreme, deadly persecution at the hands of both the Sunni jihadist Boko Haram group and the jihadist Fulani terrorists often referred to as “herdsmen.” The Nigerian government under President Muhammadu Buhari has repeatedly claimed that it has defeated Boko Haram and has taken more recently to claiming, in response to ongoing Boko Haram attacks, that the group responsible for Boko Haram attacks is actually the Islamic State (Boko Haram pledged allegiance to the Islamic State, so they are the same group). The “defeated” Boko Haram reportedly funnels as much as $43 million in clandestine funds through Nigerian banks annually, according to a Nigerian government money laundering agency, and jihadists continue to plague both local officials and Christian communities in the north of the country.

The Fulani jihadists may be an even greater threat to the free exercise of Christianity in the country. Initially described as a conflict between Fulani Muslim herders and Christian farmers over how to use land, the Fulani insurgency has taken on near-genocidal proportions with little intervention from Buhari, himself a Fulani Muslim. Fulani groups regularly threaten massacres if Christian communities do not shut down churches or remove displays of faith. Unlike Boko Haram, which is mostly relegated to northeastern Borno state, entire communities of thousands of Christians in multiple states have been displaced by Fulani attacks, greatly destabilizing the country. To ensure the few Christians who survive their attacks never return, Fulanis tend to burn down entire villages of hundreds of homes.

“There are many orphans in IDP [internally displaced people] camps and many of them don’t even know their parents, because Fulani herdsmen came and killed them,” the governor of Nigeria’s Benue state, Samuel Ortom, said on Monday. Ortom noted that he has taken in four such orphans himself, but that the number is simply too large due to the scope of the danger from Fulani jihadists.

The Buhari government has done next to nothing to address the problem, and the Biden administration rewarded it.

Vladimir Putin

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND - JUNE 16: U.S. President Joe Biden (R) and Russian President Vladimir Putin meet during the U.S.-Russia summit at Villa La Grange on June 16, 2021 in Geneva, Switzerland. Biden is meeting his Russian counterpart, Putin, for the first time as president in Geneva, Switzerland. (Photo by Peter Klaunzer - Pool/Keystone via Getty Images)

U.S. President Joe Biden (R) and Russian President Vladimir Putin meet during the U.S.-Russia summit at Villa La Grange on June 16, 2021, in Geneva, Switzerland. (Pool/Keystone via Getty Images)

After hyperventilating for four years about how President Donald Trump was allegedly a Kremlin plant intent on tanking the country and rebuilding the Soviet Union, the Democrats have done little to oppose several major Biden policy decisions that actively benefit Russian leader Vladimir Putin. The largest and most obvious gift Biden has handed Putin is the repeal of sanctions imposed on the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline, which would connect Russia to Germany and give the Putin regime unfettered access to the European market – icing out key American ally Ukraine.

The move prompted a tirade from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky in which he proclaimed himself “very unpleasantly surprised” and complained that he found out the sanctions would be lifted from television news, not from the White House. Zelensky also immediately demanded a meeting with Biden to discuss the issue before Biden met with Putin – a demand Biden promptly ignored.

Biden has since threatened to restore the sanctions, but only if Russia invades Ukraine – by which time, Zelensky pointedly noted this month, the sanctions “won’t matter to anyone.”

Putin has indicated he gets along very well with Biden – with policies that benefit Moscow, why wouldn’t he? – and the Kremlin was happy to offer that the two leaders joked around plenty during their last video meeting in early December.

Also greatly benefitting Putin is Biden’s extension, then sudden cancelation, of the Afghan War, resulting in key American assets no longer present near Russia and the return of the Taliban to power, now with interests aligned with Moscow.

The Taliban

Head of the Taliban delegation, deputy prime minister Abdul Salam Hanafi speaks to the media during an international conference on Afghanistan in Moscow on October 20, 2021. (Alexander Zemlianichenko/Pool/AFP)

Head of the Taliban delegation, deputy prime minister Abdul Salam Hanafi speaks to the media during an international conference on Afghanistan in Moscow on October 20, 2021. (Alexander Zemlianichenko/Pool/AFP)

After 20 years out of power – a result of its ties to the al-Qaeda jihadist organization and the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks – the Afghan Taliban triumphantly entered Kabul as then-President Ashraf Ghani stuffed a helicopter with millions of dollars in cash and flew away.

It was a victory made possible only through the bizarrely incoherent policies of President Joe Biden. Last year, the Taliban agreed to stay out of Kabul and not to attack Americans in exchange for President Donald Trump agreeing to end the 20-year Afghan War by May 1, 2021. Biden decided to break the agreement, extending the war, an extremely unpopular one in America, and giving the Taliban an excuse to break the deal. Taliban jihadists enthusiastically did so, launching 22,000 attacks in the four months following Biden breaking the agreement in April.

By August, the Afghan government no longer existed.

The Taliban is now making friends with China, Russia, and Iran; duping the United Nations by claiming to be interested in creating an “inclusive” government; and severely repressing the women and girls of Afghanistan while engaging in massacres of people suspected to have ties to the U.S. or former Afghan government. Controlling Kabul also means controlling Afghanistan’s vast natural resources, including a large supply of rare-earth metals and, of course, poppy fields for cultivating opium.

Arguably no human rights abuser has benefitted more from Biden’s presidency than the Taliban. Except…

China

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 15: U.S. President Joe Biden participates in a virtual meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Roosevelt Room of the White House November 15, 2021 in Washington, DC. President Biden met with his Chinese counterpart to discuss bilateral issues. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

U.S. President Joe Biden participates in a virtual meeting with Chinese dictator Xi Jinping at the Roosevelt Room of the White House November 15, 2021, in Washington, DC. President Biden met with his Chinese counterpart to discuss bilateral issues. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The rise of a longtime business associate of the Chinese Communist Party to the presidency has come with some perks for Beijing. The Biden administration has excelled in showing diplomatic weakness in the face of a country committing the world’s worst genocide ongoing today. To Secretary of State Blinken’s credit, he has called the mass internment, sterilization, and execution of Uyghur Muslims and other minorities in China a “genocide” – just not to the face of the Communist Party.

At a disastrous meeting with senior Chinese officials in Alaska in March, Blinken instead chose to blandly agree with Chinese officials that America is the true human rights villain, echoing the grievances of the Marxist group Black Lives Matter. Chinese officials have publicly scolded Blinken like a child on several other occasions, but at least the Alaska meeting was the only one so embarrassing Chinese companies sold celebratory swag to commemorate it.

Then there are the actual policies. Biden has refused to boycott the 2022 Winter Olympics, set to take place in Beijing, over the Uyghur genocide. Worse than not boycotting, however, the Biden administration announced it would engage in what it called a “diplomatic boycott,” meaning politicians would not travel to Beijing. China pointed and laughed at the non-boycott, its state media arms observing that the diplomats in question were never invited, so they couldn’t “boycott” if they wanted to.

Despite rampant human rights abuses, intellectual property theft, and attempts to subvert free speech laws in the United States, Biden also insists on cooperating with the Chinese Communist Party on the environment, his officials repeatedly claiming that China is key to combatting climate change. The fact that China is the world’s worst polluter – in carbon emissions, in plastic waste, by almost every possible metric – seems to escape “climate czar” John Kerry, who personally benefits from business with China. In a coup for China, Biden returned the United States to the Paris Climate Agreement, which claims to aspire to limit carbon emissions but actually allows China to increase its emissions, the worst in the world, for at least another decade. With Biden in power, the Chinese government has walked back that promise, too.

Follow Frances Martel on Facebook and Twitter.

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