North Carolina Voter ID Bill Becomes Law After Lawmakers Override Cooper’s Veto

The Associated Press
AP Photo/Nati Harnik

A North Carolina voter ID bill became law Wednesday afternoon after state lawmakers overrode Democrat Gov. Roy Cooper’s veto of the bill.

State lawmakers in the House voted to override Cooper’s veto of the legislation on Wednesday, a day after the Senate voted to override the veto.

The recently passed legislation enacted a voter-approved constitutional amendment requiring voters to show photo identification at the polls.

Even though more than 55 percent of state voters approved of the legislation in a referendum, Cooper vetoed the measure on Friday.

The Democrat governor’s veto came after pressure from a handful of left-wing groups such as the American Civil Liberties Union and Equality NC.

North Carolina Republican lawmakers vowed to challenge Cooper’s veto in the days following the Democrat governor’s veto because his action went against the wishes of state residents.

“Delivering a voter ID law to North Carolinians who supported this simple yet essential election integrity measure on the ballot in November was a constitutional imperative,” said House Speaker Tim Moore (R-Cleveland). “I’m proud of the commitment House lawmakers made to finish this accomplishment and keep our promise to the people of North Carolina who approved voter ID in our state constitution.”

North Carolina will join 34 other states with voter ID laws on the books, but the recently approved legislation is already facing legal challenges from left-wing critics.

The Southern Coalition for Social Justice filed a lawsuit in Wake County Superior Court hours after the lawmakers passed the voter ID bill, challenging the state’s voter ID requirements and requesting the law not go into effect until the court hears the legal challenge.

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