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opioid epidemic

Report: DHS Warns Extremists Could Use Fentanyl as Weapon of Mass Destruction

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is weighing designating fentanyl as a “weapon of mass destruction” (WMD). The deadly synthetic opioid mainly originates in China and is the top driver of the unprecedented number of fatal drug overdoses in the United States, an internal memo obtained by Task & Purpose revealed this week.

The US opioid epidemic is accelerating, with hospital emergency room visits for overdoses from drugs like heroin, fentanyl and prescription painkillers up 30 percent from 2016 to 2017, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Tim Carney on ‘Alienated America’: Loss of Factory, Church, Community Caused ‘American Carnage’

Washington Examiner commentary editor Timothy Carney, author of Alienated America: Why Some Places Thrive While Others Collapse, described the “destruction of a way of life” among “working class” people in rural and industrial regions wrought by the status quo of globalization in a Monday interview on SiriusXM’s Breitbart News Tonight with hosts Rebecca Mansour and Joel Pollak.

DETROIT, MI - SEPTEMBER 04: Ruins at the abandoned Packard Automotive Plant are seen on September 4, 2013 in Detroit, Michigan. The Packard Plant was a 3.5 million square foot car manufacturing plant built completed in 1911. Major operations ceased in 1958, though the plant was used in a limited …

Report: Experts Insist Opioid Fentanyl Could Be Used as ‘Tool of Terror’

Terrorists could potentially use fentanyl – a synthetic opioid is mainly produced in China that is the primary source behind the fatal overdose epidemic in the United States – as a “weapon of mass destruction,” Bloomberg News recently reported, citing experts and echoing other articles.

China says US should curb its demand for opioids

Better OxyContin Leads to Worse Heroin Epidemic

The conventional wisdom on the opioid crisis is that prescription drug dependency was a major factor behind the surge of addictions and overdoses. This belief was challenged by studies demonstrating that prescription drug problems from the 1990s and 2000s were fading before the current opioid crisis began, and the real problem today is with street drugs like heroin and fentanyl. New research highlights a very sharp dividing line between the earlier pill problem and today’s drug crisis: OxyContin was reformulated in 2010 to cut down on abuse, so addicts turned to heroin.

ST. JOHNSBURY, VT - FEBRUARY 06: Drugs are prepared to shoot intravenously by a user addicted to heroin on February 6, 2014 in St. Johnsbury Vermont. Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin recently devoted his entire State of the State speech to the scourge of heroin. Heroin and other opiates have begun …

Obama’s Welcome for Migrants Allowed ‘Chemical Warfare’ on Americans

The early theory of the opioid crisis and the “White Death” was that over-reliance on prescription painkillers was a major factor in rising mortality rates. Americans were reporting more pain to doctors than ever before, and receiving more painkiller prescriptions as a result. New research and analysis challenge these assumptions by arguing that the opioid crisis flows largely from drugs like heroin and fentanyl, which exploded just as prescription drug use was beginning to decline, and one of the primary contributing factors was the migrant crisis President Barack Obama unleashed in his second term.

Deadly Fentanyl

Hayward: Trump Claims to ‘Know the Answer’ to Drug Crisis, But Experts Disagree About Causes

2017 was the year rising mortality rates for middle-aged whites in America came onto the public and government policy radar screen, two years after a landmark study from Princeton economists Angus Deaton and Anne Case first detected the statistical spike. The causes of the White Death are complex, but it seems clear that one of the important factors is the rise of drug addiction, particularly opioids – from prescription painkillers to heroin.

opiod

Texan Sentenced for Role in Fentanyl Distribution Ring

A U.S. district court judge sentenced a Texas man to serve 20 years in federal prison for his role in a large-scale fentanyl distribution ring where he sold up to 10 grams a day of a designer version of the dangerous synthetic opioid.

Fentanyl is a potent prescription painkiller which is extremely addictive, leading people to seek out illegal copycat versions