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Stockholm Syndrome: Sweden Offers Taxpayer-Funded Benefits To Lure ‘Alienated’ Jihadists Home

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Sweden knows how to save the world from Islamic State (IS) terrorists as they tire of beheadings, crucifixions, murders and random acts of extrajudicial killing. Just be very, very nice to them.

According to WND news service, a programme to help jaded IS fighters rejoin society has started in Sweden’s Örebro Municipality, where jihadists can obtain “psychological help to overcome traumatic experiences they may have suffered while fighting in Iraq and Syria.”

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The Swedish newspaper Expressen reports that councillor Rasmus Persson advocates offering terrorists jobs so they don’t “feel alienated” as they endure their post-battlefield existential funk. At the same time Stockholm has released a document outlining its “strategy against violent extremism.”

Here is a translated excerpt from that nine-page guide to helping jihadists when they return home.

Post-perspective: When a person wishes to leave a violent extremist grouping or coming home from combat overseas, it is crucial to provide customized inclusion efforts. Even then, it is important to have a local cooperation between various actors. Voluntary organizations can provide targeted support and advice. Even faith communities working with advice, but also psychosocial support.

When it comes to people who participated in combat there is likely to be great need of health efforts. Therefore, it is important to establish cooperation between social services, social psychiatry and drug units, as well as health centers and psychiatric services (trauma, PTSD, etc.)

When it comes to security, it is important that cooperation between social services, income support, employment and other efforts by the Labour Department, as well as assistance with job placement.
Finally, the accommodation issue is a prerequisite that must work. Therefore, cooperative housing companies needs to be included in the post-perspective.”

Councillor Persson agrees. He told the news program Tvärsnytt, “We have discussed how we should work for these guys who have come back, and to prevent them from returning to the fighting, and that they should be helped to process the traumatic experiences they have been through.”

All this fast-tracked past the queue of law-abiding immigrants and indigenous Swedes. Such conspicuous acts of kindness to avowed Islamic murderers are not cheap, either. That’s why Sweden’s official coordinator against violent extremism, Mona Sahlin – a former leader of the Social Democrat Party – advocates using taxpayer funds to underwrite the services.

WND reports one Swedish soldier stationed in Kabul during his third mission in Afghanistan is not so sure the plan will work or even if it is available to those on the front line taking the fight to IS. He posted a challenge on Facebook and asked that Sweden extend the program to its own warriors returning from active duty.

“In a few months, I’m back in Sweden after being deployed in Afghanistan, against the Taliban and others who have really jeopardizing development in this very sore country,” Frederick Brandberg wrote. “There is no permanent job waiting for me when I come home.”

Brandberg added: “It would be wonderful if I was met with a comparable program after my homecoming, after which I could feel safe in having a regular job, with monthly income and a social stable situation in the society where I wouldn’t need to wonder whether I’m wanted or not.”

In November 2014, the Swedish government estimated between 250 and 300 of its citizens have traveled to Syria and Iraq to join ISIS.

Just two months ago, Sweden’s national job agency fired all of its own contracted “immigrant resettlement assistants” because they were recruiting fighters for ISIS.

 


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