Poll: Majority of Black and Hispanic Voters Support Voter ID

FERGUSON, MO - NOVEMBER 04: Treveyon Brock casts his ballot as people wait in line at polling place on November 4, 2014 near Ferguson, Missouri. In last Aprils election only 1,484 of Ferguson's 12,096 registered voters cast ballots. Community leaders are hoping for a much higher turnout for this election. …
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A majority of registered voters, including a majority of black and Hispanic voters, overwhelmingly support voter ID, a key election integrity measure, a HEP and HEP Action survey —  which comes as Democrats continue to advance H.R. 1 — revealed.

Jason Snead, the Executive Director of the Honest Elections Project, sent a memo to members of Congress ahead of Wednesday’s Senate Rules Committee hearing on House-passed H.R. 1, or the “For the People Act,” which would essentially federalize U.S. elections, stripping states of their ability to implement basic election integrity measures, such as voter ID, by micromanaging the election process administered by each individual state.

Contrary to the Democrat Party’s narrative, Snead’s memo reveals that the majority of voters, including the majority of black and Hispanic voters, support basic election integrity measures such as voter ID, which Democrats routinely describe as a form of voter suppression.

Seventy-seven percent of registered voters across the board favor requiring individuals to show an ID before casting a ballot, compared to 15 percent who oppose the idea. This is a common theme across party lines, with 92 percent of Republicans, 75 percent of Independents, and 63 percent of Democrats supporting voter ID. This includes a majority of black and Hispanic voters, who back voter ID laws 64 percent to 22 percent and 78 percent to 16 percent, respectively.

Notably, a majority of voters who supported Biden in 2020 also back election ID requirements by a 38-point margin, 62 percent to 24 percent.

The survey also found that over three-quarters of low income voters “reject the notion that showing an ID is a ‘burden,’ despite frequent claims from the left.”

Several red-state attorneys general have warned that they are prepared to take legal action if H.R. 1 becomes law, deeming it unconstitutional.

“The Act would invert that constitutional structure, commandeer state resources, confuse and muddle elections procedures, and erode faith in our elections and systems of governance,” the attorneys general wrote in a letter addressed to House and Senate leaders, warning that they will “seek legal remedies to protect the Constitution, the sovereignty of all states, our elections, and the rights of our citizens” if the measure becomes law.

Twice failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is among progressives urging the Senate to pass H.R. 1, describing it as a “once-in-a-generation opportunity.”

The survey, taken March 4-10, among 1,200 registered voters, has a margin of error of +/- 2.83 percent.

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