militias

Libyan Government Seeks Unity; Islamic State Seeks Two-Thirds of Libya

The new Libyan “unity” government took a long time to reach the capital of Tripoli, because the Islamist warlords in control of the city would not let them use a plane. They had to sail from Tobruk to Tripoli by boat. They made port at the end of March, but did not get much further than the fortified naval base, where the “Government of National Accord” remains ensconced.

LIBYA, Tripoli : Students walk past a wall painted with a graffiti reading "free Libya" in the Libyan capital Tripoli, on March 31, 2016. / AFP / MAHMUD TURKIA

Militia Groups Along the Border Continue to Spark Controversy

Groups of gunmen are patrolling the border in an effort to “secure” the land that Washington officials will not. The groups, known as militias, have been around for some time and in recent years the various groups have become more noticeable as the topic of border security becomes more heated. Generally militia groups patrol specific areas of the U.S.-Mexico border in an effort to detain or turn back human smugglers and drug traffickers. Mainstream media outlets generally demonize the groups claiming that they are extremist and racists.

The Associated Press

Rival Militia Leaders Released from Prison in Mexico, Violence Expected

In one of the most turbulent areas affected by Mexico’s drug war, more violence is expected after two rival militia leaders were exonerated by a judge for acting in self-defense.

The March 10 ruling resulted in the release from prison of Hipólito Mora, founder of one of the first so-called autodefensa groups in the town of La Ruana, Michoacan, along with 26 of his men, according to a Vice News report. Luis Antonio “El Americano” Torres, leader of the rival Buenavista group, was expected to be released very soon.

Members of the community police walk near a deceased member of the Knights Templar cartel (Caballeros Templarios) after a clash in Michoacan state