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Women’s March Organizer: ‘White Jews, as White People, Uphold White Supremacy’

LAS VEGAS, NV - JANUARY 21: Women's March Co-Chairwomen Tamika D. Mallory (L) and Linda Sarsour speak during the Women's March 'Power to the Polls' voter registration tour launch at Sam Boyd Stadium on January 21, 2018 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Demonstrators across the nation gathered over the weekend, one …
Ethan Miller/Getty Images
ROBERT KRAYCHIK

Tamika Mallory, co-president of the Women’s March, told the New York Times that “white Jews … uphold white supremacy.” She also told a fellow left-wing activist “that Jews [need] to confront their own role in racism.”

Vanessa Wruble, a self-described Jewish activist and “early organizer of the Women’s March,” told the Times she was pushed out of the political campaign, in part, because of her “Jewish identity.”

She subsequently founded another left-wing political campaign called March On, which describes its members as “allies of the resistance” seeking to “lift up the voices of the marginalized.” The Times described March On as an organization that “supports local women activists,” making no mention of its ideological or partisan politics.

According to Wruble, Women’s March leadership was reluctant to focus on Jewish women for fear of alienating Black Lives Matter activists. She said Women’s March leaders told her, “We really couldn’t center Jewish women in this or we might turn off groups like Black Lives Matter.”

Wruble also noted how the Nation of Islam would be providing security at Women’s March events.

Evvie Harmon, another march organizer, recalled how Mallory disparaged Wruble on account of the latter’s Jewish ethnicity. She told Tablet:

I suddenly realized that [Tamika Mallory] was berating [Vanessa Wruble] — but it wasn’t about her being white. It was about her being Jewish. “Your people this, your people that.” I was raised in the South and the language that was used is language that I’m very used to hearing in rural South Carolina. Just instead of against black people, against Jewish people. They even said to her “your people hold all the wealth.” You could hear a pin drop. It was awful.

Via statement to the New York Times, Mallory said, “Since that conversation, we’ve all learned a lot about how while white Jews, as white people, uphold white supremacy, ALL Jews are targeted by it.” She further denied disparaging Wruble’s Jewishness while admitting she told left-wing activist white women that she did not trust them.

While reporting on “allegations” of anti-Semitism against Mallory from Tablet, the New York Times omitted any mention of anti-Zionism within the ranks of the Women’s March or of the campaign’s support for Palestinian statehood and alignment with Palestinian nationalism, more broadly. It further ignored Mallory’s recent description of Israel’s founding as a “human rights crime” established by killing, stealing, and “taking the lives of people who were there first.”

Mallory has praised Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan as the “greatest of all time.”

Women’s March leader Linda Sarsour accused left-wing Jews of prioritizing Israel’s welfare over domestic advancement of leftism while supporting self-described “intersectional feminist” and incoming Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN).

In November of 2012, Omar called on “Allah” to awaken humanity to Israel’s supposed hypnosis of the globe via Twitter:

A Women’s March declaration of principles specifically omits any mention of white, Christian, or Jewish women: “We must create a society in which all women — including Black women, Indigenous women, poor women, immigrant women, disabled women, Muslim women, lesbian, queer and trans women — are free.”

The New York Times alluded to neo-Marxist social theories of supposed intersectional power dynamics and associated hierarchies of oppression: “The allegations of anti-Semitism are particularly painful because Women’s March organizers made a commitment from the beginning to work across racial and religious lines, and to be led by what they considered the most ‘marginalized’ women.” It described the Women’s March founders as a “diverse group of women” while omitting any reference towards their left-wing or partisan Democrat politics.

In a March interview, Hillary Clinton said white women who voted for Donald Trump did so out of subservience to their husbands. Assorted left-wing celebrities and pundits have joined the narrative of denouncing white women for insufficient support of left-wing and partisan Democrat politics.

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