Tag: Dr. Peter Hotez

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Public Officials Warn Texans of Health Threats in Harvey’s Wake

As floodwaters caused by Hurricane Harvey recede along the hard hit Texas Gulf Coast and Houston areas, public officials and medical experts warn residents of significant health threats they may face in the aftermath of the cataclysmic storm.

typhus

Typhus on Rise in Texas, Say Disease Experts

Typhus, a flea-borne infectious disease thought to be all but eradicated in the United States, appears to be on the rise in Texas, say tropical disease experts.

The Zika virus is primarily transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, and also by sexual contact

Six Pregnant Texas Women Test Positive for Zika

Six pregnant Texas woman tested positive for Zika health officials announced Thursday. The patients hailed from Harris County where, locally, this marked the first cases of the mosquito-borne virus reported this year.

Cameron Fierro

Texas Sees Bump in Mumps

Public health officials say that Texas has hit its highest number of mumps cases in more than 20 years with multiple outbreaks across the state including cases possibly linked to South Padre Island and spring break travel.

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CDC Awards Texas $10M to Fight Zika

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) awarded nearly $10 million to the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) in Galveston to study emerging and exotic pathogens such as Zika. This announcement came as Texas reported its sixth locally-transmitted case of the virus.

Vaccine (Joe Raedle / Getty)

Texas Doc: Anti-Vaxxers Risk ‘Measles Time Bombs’ in 2018

Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of Texas Children’s Hospital and president of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, foresees a dangerous measles epidemic erupting the Lone Star State by 2018 driven by plummeting vaccination rates while propelled by an anti-vaccination movement.

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First Zika Case in Texas’ Montgomery County is Pregnant Woman

A pregnant woman is the first person diagnosed with Zika in Montgomery County, say Texas public health officials. They did not indicate where the woman contracted the virus, only that it was on travel outside of the United States to a known Zika-infested region.