forced labor

U.S. Customs: China Using Forced Labor in Inner Mongolia

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) issued a notice on Tuesday that accused a Chinese company of using “convict, forced, or indentured labor” to manufacture products that could be exported to the United States. The company in questioned is directly owned by the Chinese government.

In this file image from undated video footage run by China's CCTV via AP Video, Muslim trainees work in a garment factory at the Hotan Vocational Education and Training Center in Hotan, Xinjiang, northwest China. A U.S. company that stocks college bookstores with t-shirts and other team apparel cut ties …

Chinese Factory Manager: ‘There Are No Human Rights in Xinjiang’

Human-rights watchdog Bitter Winter published an interview Sunday with a garment factory manager in China’s Xinjiang province who said the thousand or so Uyghur Muslims who work for his operation are used as slave laborers, despite the regime’s assurances that work programs in the province are a benefit to local participants.

Supporters of China's Muslim Uighur minority wave flags of East Turkestan on December 20, 2019 during a demostration at Fatih in Istanbul. - More than 1,000 protesters marched on December 20, 2019, in Istanbul to protest against China over its treatment of mainly Muslim Uighurs in Xinjiang, an AFP correspondent …

Thousands of South Koreans Hold Candlelight Protest Against Japan

Thousands filled the streets of Seoul on Saturday night, carrying candles and signs of protest against Japan’s tighter trade restrictions on South Korea. More marches and rallies are planned every weekend as Liberation Day, the holiday commemorating the end of Japanese occupation in 1945, approaches on August 15.

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - AUGUST 03: South Korean protesters participate in a rally to denounce Japan's new trade restrictions on South Korea in front of the Japanese embassy on August 03, 2019 in Seoul, South Korea. Japan approved a bill removing South Korea from its "whitelist" of trusted trade partners. …

Japanese Prime Minister Abe Seeks Summit with North Korean Dictator Kim Jong-un

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has offered to meet North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un without preconditions, a considerable political risk given Abe’s previous focus on resolving the issue of Japanese citizens kidnapped by North Korea before any such talks could occur. Abe’s softening stance toward North Korea comes as Japanese relations with South Korea are deteriorating due to even older issues that stretch back to World War II.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has already said publicly that he would meet Kim Jong Un in order to resolve the issue of Japanese citizens who were abducted in the 1970s and 1980s to help Pyongyang train its spies