foreign intelligence surveillance act

Sessions Appointed Prosecutor Months Ago to Investigate Possible Crimes, Might Appoint 2nd Special Prosecutor

Attorney General Jeff Sessions appointed prosecutors in 2017 to investigate matters Congress referred to the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) as growing scandals possibly involved criminal activities. These prosecutors will report directly back to Sessions, who told Fox News on Wednesday night that he will then decide whether a second special prosecutor is necessary to take these matters to court.

Jeff Sessions, Shannon Bream

Steve King’s Memo Warning: ‘Watch Closely for Barack Obama’s Fingerprints’

“Watch closely for Barack Obama’s fingerprints,” said Rep. Steve King (R-IA) on Saturday, suggesting the recent alleged partisan weaponization of state surveillance powers could be connected to the 44th president. “[Democrats and their allies] will defend Barack Obama at all costs, and they’ll defend Hillary Clinton almost at all costs unless they have to sacrifice her to protect Barack Obama,” he added.

The Associated Press

Former FBI Assistant Director on FISA Applications: ‘It’s Not Going to Get Released for the Public’

Public release of FISA applications submitted by the FBI and Department of Justice (DOJ) seeking warrants from the Federal Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) to surveil Carter Page “is not going to happen,” Ron Hosko, former assistant director of the Criminal Investigative Division at FBI Headquarters, said during an interview Friday on Sirius XM’s Breitbart News Tonight with Senior Editor-at-Large Rebecca Mansour.

FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2016, file photo, Carter Page, a former foreign policy adviser of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, speaks at a news conference at RIA Novosti news agency in Moscow, Russia. A published report says the FBI obtained a court order to monitor communications of an adviser to then-candidate Donald …

Chinese-American Pleads Guilty to Stealing Genetically-Engineered Seeds

A case of industrial espionage linked to China concluded with prison time, property forfeiture, and possible deportation on Wednesday, as 46-year-old Mo Hailong—a Chinese citizen described as a “permanent resident of the United States” by the New York Times—pled guilty to charges of stealing high-tech seed corn from American companies.

Reuters/Adrees Latif