Stephen Breyer

Supreme Court Allows Military Transgender Ban to Continue—for Now

WASHINGTON, DC – The Supreme Court voted 5-4 on Tuesday to block lower court orders that had prevented President Donald Trump’s policy on transgender military troops from taking effect. The matter is now expected to go back before the justices for final judgment in the next year.

Trump, Transgenders, Military

Klukowski: Nuclear Option Restores Constitutional Balance

Thursday’s nuclear option vote restores 200 years of Senate practice, going far beyond Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation to restore the proper constitutional balance for Supreme Court and federal court appointments.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch listens as he is asked a question as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Supreme Court Hears Case on Fatal Border Shooting

How a U.S. Border Patrol argent’s use of lethal force at the U.S-Mexican border implicates constitutional rights and foreign affairs dominated arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday in Hernandez v. Mesa. The lawyer arguing that the agent should be held liable had a rough day in front of the justices.

Hernandez Shooting AP

Democrats Debate Recess Appointing Garland to SCOTUS

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Rumors whispered around Washington have it that Democrats are debating having President Barack Obama install Judge Merrick Garland on the Supreme Court by a recess appointment on Jan. 3.

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Supreme Court Split on Obama Transgender Rule

WASHINGTON, DC—Wednesday the Supreme Court temporarily blocked President Obama’s changing of federal law to grant special protections to transgender people, but did so with a signal that if Hillary Clinton becomes president, the Court will make Obama’s rewriting of current civil rights laws permanent.

Students in Hallway PAUL J. RICHARDSAFPGetty Images

Supreme Court: City Violated Cop’s Free-Speech Rights

Last week, the Supreme Court held that when the government mistakenly believes a person is exercising his free-speech rights, yet that person is, in fact, not exercising any rights at all, it still violates the First Amendment to punish that person for what officials thought he was doing. The Court’s conservative justices disagree.

The U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, Monday, March 7, 2011. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Fate of Obama’s Amnesty Uncertain at Supreme Court

WASHINGTON—Justices on the Supreme Court were sharply divided on several aspects of President Barack Obama’s executive amnesty, but it’s very likely that the 26 states challenging Obama’s program will prevail, ending the president’s gambit to grant legal status to 4.5 million illegal aliens.

Supreme court justices AP

Justice Breyer: No Comment on Donald Trump, but Detention Camps Unlikely

Justice Stephen Breyer will not express an opinion on Donald Trump as a presidential candidate, in keeping with two centuries of Supreme Court tradition. But he did express an opinion on a related point: American courts are unlikely to allow Muslims to be held in detention camps.

AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta