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5th Circuit Court of Appeals

Demonstrators march in the Texas Capitol on Monday, May 29, 2017, protesting the state's newly passed anti-sanctuary cities bill in Austin, Texas. Opponents call Texas' anti-sanctuary cities law a "show your papers" law since it empowers police to inquire about peoples' immigration status during routine interactions such as traffic stops. …

Texas’ Anti-Sanctuary City Law Can Be Enforced, Appeals Court Rules

The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals sided with Texas and overturned the lower court’s ruling on the State’s new anti-sanctuary city law. The unanimous decision by the court will allow the State of Texas to move forward with enforcing key provisions of the law including the duty of law enforcement agencies to detain illegal aliens wanted by immigration officials.

U.S Border Patrol agents arrest 76 illegal immigrants near Texas border

5th Circuit Reinstates Texas’ Alien Harboring Law

The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a lower court’s injunction, reinstating Texas’ illegal alien harboring law. The three-judge panel poured out the plaintiff’s claim that renting houses or providing social services would put them at risk of prosecution.

Abbott on fire cartoon

Texas Paper Apologizes After Tweeting Cartoon of Governor on Fire in Wheelchair

The Austin American Statesman issued an apology after tweeting a cartoon of Texas Governor Greg Abbott with his pants in flames while sitting in his wheelchair. The cartoon was son Wednesday afternoon in connection with an opinion piece that was previously published in April, before the governor’s accident where he was severely burned.

Ashley Nicole Richards and Brent Justice

Couple Back to Court in Texas for ‘Animal Crush Videos’

HOUSTON, Texas – A Houston couple will, once again, face federal trial for making and distributing “animal crush videos” depicting the torture and killing of animals after the Supreme Court of the United States declined to accept appellate review. Federal District Court Judge Sim Lake previously dismissed the charges against Ashley Nichole Richards and Brent Justice — calling the videos protected free speech.