Delingpole: ‘Too Hot to Train’ Because Climate Change, Whines Army General

general
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

A British army general has warned that climate change could soon make it “too hot to train” at certain times of year.

Lieutenant General Richard Nugee, the Ministry of Defence’s Green Tsar, said in a speech to Defence and Security Equipment International:

 On land, a warm year in the 2000s will broadly become an average year in the 2040s, affecting our ability to train, as we lose more days to being ‘too hot to train’.  A recent study by the UK Met Office identified that in temperate climates the number of days lost to training due to increases in temperatures is likely to rise by between 75 and 150 per cent by 2040.  In Cyprus, the projection is that all training will be lost in August to heat.

But it’s not all bad news, Nugee went on to argue. First, going green might make the Army more attractive to recruits who are into that sort of thing:

There are significant opportunities for us not only to improve operational effectiveness, and our attractiveness to recruits…

And secondly, magical unicorns will fly from the sky, with Gaia’s warriors astride their mighty, rainbow-coloured backs, and confound Britain’s enemies wherever they may be. Or something.

There are many opportunities where adopting a green approach, understanding the effects of climate change and the technology being developed to adapt to and mitigate its effects, can result in a more capable force – either directly through adoption of new technologies or indirectly through opportunities to become more self-sufficient and resilient, thereby saving money that can be spent on enhancing further our operational capability.

Judging by the comments in the Telegraph‘s report on this story, British taxpayers are not best pleased at this misuse of the nation’s military budget:

 

Well — that’s quite handy. I spent many hours / days / weeks on patrol in glamour spots such as Basra and Helmand where it is 50 degrees in the shade during summer, strapped into helmet, body armour and 15kg of kit and don’t remember the chain of command being too fussed. Oh — and by the way Nugee; if the world is getting hotter, you need to train in hotter places to be at readiness — duh.

 

Who dares….. Stops because it’s a bit hot. Please.

 

I bet Nugee is very much in favour of a sustainable, inclusive, diverse, non-patriarchal army that is free from micro-agressions (and provides a safe space for all).

 

Perhaps Lt Nugee should go and get a proper job so we don’t have to pay for him.

 

is this Nugee related to Lady Nugee?

 

The answer to the last question is: yes. Richard Nugee is the brother-in-law of the similarly dismal Labour MP Emily Thornberry, aka Lady Nugee, currently Shadow Secretary of State for International Trade.

Lt Gen Nugee, you could argue, is only obeying orders. Someone had to become the Army’s Green Tsar and he drew the short straw. At the same time, though, going green and taking time off from training when it’s too hot or cold do not sound like war-winning strategies.

As Paul Homewood notes:

How on earth does this idiot think the Eighth Army managed to fight in North Africa in 1942?

Temperatures around the world range from 80C below to 50C above freezing, so why should a half a degree of warming make the slightest difference to soldiers? They have to be prepared and equipped for every eventuality.

general

Two soldiers belonging to the Commonwealth and Allied forces lead their donkeys as they walk in the Egyptian desert in October 1942 near the battlefield of El Alamein, about 60 miles (100 kilometres) west of Alexandria. The decisive World War II battle of El Alamein, which began 23 October 1942 and ended 12 days later, a culmination of two years of fighting in North Africa between 100,000 German and Italian troops, led by German Field Marshal Rommel and 150,000 Commonwealth and allied forces under the command of British Field Marshal Montgomery, proved a decisive Allied victory, helping to establish control in the Mediterranean and securing the Suez Canal. (-/AFP via Getty Images)

Follow Breitbart London on Facebook: Breitbart London

 

.

Please let us know if you're having issues with commenting.