Declaration of Independence

Abraham Lincoln at Cooper Union: ‘Right Makes Might’

This Saturday, February 28, was the 156th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s Cooper Union Address, which was delivered at Cooper Union, in New York City. It was the speech that launched Lincoln to the White House in the election of 1860; it was the speech that paved the path for a newly-formed Republican Party to take the White House for the first time, buoyed by its identification with the boldest and most unmistakeable principles.

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MLK Day: The Enduring Power of the Declaration and American Ideas

Martin Luther King Jr. Day is centered around the civil rights leader’s January 15 birthday and was signed into law by President Ronald Reagan in 1983. Though there are many reasons for celebrating and debating his life’s legacy, Martin King Jr. is primarily remembered in the 21st century for his famous “I Have a Dream” speech.

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Learning What It Means to be American

Peter Schramm, the late Professor of Political Science at Ashland University, used to tell a moving story about his immigration to the United States. As a child fleeing communist-occupied Hungary, he asked his father where the family would go. “We are going to America,” his father replied. “Why America?” Peter asked. “Because, son,” his father answered, “we were born Americans, but in the wrong place.”

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Time for the States to Declare Independence From the Federal Government

One hundred and fifty years after the end of the Civil War, it is becoming increasingly clear that there are two Americas—one where the principles of constitutionally limited government and individual liberty are still revered, the other where statism and the trampling of individual rights are on the rise. Widespread resistance at the state level, however, will require two elements: strong governors and strong state legislatures willing to vigorously assert their 10th amendment rights.

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